Livio Di Matteo

Professor of Economics, Lakehead University

Livio Di Matteo is a Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute and Professor of Economics at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario, where he specializes in public policy and finance, health economics, and economic history. His most recent work examines value for money in health-care spending and the drivers and sustainability of health-care spending; fiscal economic history; and the historical evolution of economic inequality in Canada and internationally. Prof. Di Matteo is a member of the CIHI National Health Expenditure Advisory Panel and a contributor to Fraser Forum, the Fraser Institute’s blog, as well as his own policy blog, Northern Economist 2.0. His op-eds have appeared frequently in many newspapers across Canada including the Globe and Mail, National Post, Financial Post, Toronto Star, Winnipeg Free Press, Waterloo Region Record, and Hamilton Spectator. He has been listed in Canada’s Who’s Who since 1995 and holds a Ph.D. from McMaster University, an M.A. from the University of Western Ontario, and a B.A. from Lakehead University.

Recent Research by Livio Di Matteo

— Oct 22, 2020
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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week

Two new essays—Putting Government on a Financial Diet: The Role of Statutory Fiscal Rules by Jack Mintz, president’s fellow at the University of Calgary, and Government Size and Economic Growth: An Overview by Livio Di Matteo, professor of economics at Lakehead University and a senior fellow at the Fraser Institute—note that the federal government’s budget deficit and mounting debt, and the overall size of government in Canada, will discourage economic productivity and the possibility of a four-day work week.

— Oct 1, 2020
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Local Leviathans: The Rise of Municipal Government Spending in Canada, 1990–2018

Local Leviathans: The Rise of Municipal Government Spending in Canada, 1990–2018 finds that local governments across Canada have increased spending significantly in recent years—even before the COVID-19 pandemic and recession. In fact, from 2008 to 2018, total municipal spending in Canada increased 51 per cent, from $68.4 billion to $103.3 billion. And total municipal government revenues—including taxes, user fees and grants from other levels of government—increased 54 per cent over the same recent 10-year period.

— Aug 21, 2018
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Restoring Ontario's Public Finances

Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances finds that Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but doing so will require a focus on spending discipline. In fact, a five per cent reduction in spending from 2017/18 levels would achieve a balanced budget by 2020/21—years earlier than the 2024/25 timeline set by the previous government—and also free up $21 billion in fiscal room, which could be used to reduce taxes.