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Entrepreneurial Economist Predicted Socialism

Entrepreneurial Economist Predicted Socialism is a new essay that documents how the early 20th century economist Joseph Schumpeter predicted the end of capitalism as a result of capitalism’s very successes: the declining prominence of the innovator, increased calls for barriers to entry from successful businesses, and calls for government to limit the forces of creative destruction.

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Comparing Provincial Marginal Tax Rates for Middle-Income Earners Across Canada

Comparing Provincial Marginal Tax Rates for Middle Income Earners Across Canada finds that middle-income workers in Atlantic Canada pay much higher provincial personal income tax burdens than Western Canadians earning similar amounts. In fact, whereas Atlantic Canadian workers who earn the national average income ($52,750 in 2022) face provincial personal income tax burdens ranging from $4,463 in New Brunswick to $5,318 in Nova Scotia, workers in Western Canada earning the same amount pay provincial income tax burdens of between $2,353 in British Columbia and $3,914 in Saskatchewan.

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Report Card on British Columbia's Elementary Schools 2021

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Elementary Schools 2021, which ranks 927 public and independent elementary schools based on 10 academic indicators derived from the provincewide Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA), suggests that every school is capable of improvement regardless of type, location and student characteristics.

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Thinking About Poverty

Thinking About Poverty: Counting The Poor is the first essay in a two-part series that examines the difficulty in measuring poverty in Canada, and in particular spotlights problems with using the Market Basket Measure approach. But because poverty is a serious personal problem for many Canadians, and that it’s also an important social and economic concern that influences government spending and policy, it is crucial to get the measurement of poverty right.

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Taxes versus the Necessities of Life: The Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2022 edition

Taxes Versus the Necessities of Life: The Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2022 Edition is a new study that finds the average Canadian family spent 43 per cent of its income on taxes in 2021 compared to 35.7 per cent on basic necessities—more than housing, food and clothing costs combined. Since 1961, the average Canadian family’s total tax bill has increased nominally by 2,440 per cent, dwarfing increases in annual housing costs (1,751 per cent), clothing (643 per cent) and food (790 per cent).

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Storm Without End: The Economic and Fiscal Impact of COVID in Canada

Storm without End: The Economic Impact of COVID-19 on Canada and the Provinces finds that the economic impacts of COVID-19 varied across Canada with Alberta experiencing the steepest decline in economic activity in 2020 and Quebec experiencing the sharpest initial decline in employment.

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The Hand of Government in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

The Hand of Government in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is a new essay that documents how the IPCC was created by and is controlled by governments of countries that perceive political benefits from international regulatory action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, despite misperceptions, the IPCC has never produced a full and fair assessment of what is known and not known regarding the causes and consequences of global climate change, and its structure and processes ensure that it never will.