COVID-19

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Are Our Labour Laws Still Relevant for Teleworking?

Are Our Labour Laws Still Relevant for Teleworkers? finds that many labour policies and regulations in Canada are outdated and incompatible in a post-COVID world. The study also estimates that 25 per cent of working Canadians will continue to work remotely after COVID—although roughly 40 per cent could do so.

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What Happens If Alberta Returns to the Flat Tax System?

What Happens If Alberta Returns to the Flat Tax System? find that the Alberta government can reinstate a 10 per cent single-rate personal income tax and restore the “Alberta Tax Advantage” while incurring only a modest loss in revenue.

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The Essential UCLA School of Economics spotlights the economics department at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), which gained prominence during the last few decades of the 20th century and remains influential today.

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Generation and Management of Municipal Solid Waste: How’s Canada Doing?

Generation and Management of Municipal Solid Waste: How’s Canada Doing? is a new study that finds Canadians, on a per-person basis, generated 959 kilograms of municipal solid waste in 2018 compared to 980 kilograms in 2002. Crucially, waste from residential or household sources is on the rise, comprising more than 40 per cent of total waste generation, while waste generated from non-residential sources—industrial, commercial, etc.—has declined in Canada.

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The Determinants of Subnational Economic Freedom

The Determinants of Subnational Economic Freedom: An Analysis of Data for Seven Countries with Implications for Optimal Jurisdiction Size is a new study that examines if there is an optimal size for a subnational jurisdiction (states and provinces) that will maximize economic freedom. Covering a total of 158 states and provinces in seven countries, this study finds that provinces and states such as Ontario, California and New York whose populations have grown beyond 9.5 million people tend to have higher levels of government spending, higher taxes and less flexible labour markets.

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Interest Cost Risks to Government Budgets

Interest Cost Risks to Government Budgets is a new study that examines what would happen to government interest costs (essentially the interest paid on outstanding debt) and government budgets if interest costs returned to the near-historically low levels of 2019-20. Crucially, government interest costs could increase to $35.2 billion in 2021-22, a rise of $13.1 billion from the current projection based on the latest government budgets.

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Fiscal Lessons for Atlantic Canada from Saskatchewan

Fiscal lessons for Atlantic Canada from Saskatchewan is a new study that examines how Atlantic Canada, faced with ongoing budget deficits, can learn from Saskatchewan’s fiscal reforms during the 1990s, when the province went from the brink of insolvency to reducing taxes on personal income, businesses and investment, spurring economic growth.

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First Nations and the Petroleum Industry—from Conflict to Cooperation

First Nations and the Petroleum Industry—from Conflict to Cooperation finds that, to increase Indigenous ownership in the oil industry, First Nations should focus on small and medium-sized projects rather than mega-projects that require massive assistance from government.