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Quebec’s Daycare Program: A Flawed Policy Model

Quebec’s Daycare Program: A Flawed Policy Model finds that the province’s 20-year-old subsidized daycare program has produced skyrocketing costs along with worrying child development outcomes without eliminating wait times. Spending on a per-child basis—after adjusting for inflation—jumped 101.6 per cent since the program’s creation, from $4,874 in 1997 to $9,823 in 2016 (amounts in 2016 dollars).

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Custom Election Codes for First Nations

Custom Election Codes for First Nations: A Double-Edged Sword finds that nearly 60 per cent of Canada’s First Nations have adopted custom election systems for band chiefs and councils, instead of using Indian Act rules. And while custom-made election systems for individual First Nation bands may produce more accountable and transparent government, they may also lead to abuse of power and discrimination.

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Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017

The Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017 finds that health-care spending by provincial governments has increased by 116 per cent since 2001 and is projected to keep growing over the next 15 years. In fact, by 2031, health-care spending is projected to consume 42.6 per cent of all provincial program spending (on average), up from 40.1 per cent in 2016 and 37.6 percent in 2001.

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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2017

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta finds that government employees in Alberta—including federal, provincial and municipal workers—receive 7.9 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector and also enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits.

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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Quebec, 2017

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Quebec finds that government employees in Quebec—including federal, provincial and municipal workers—receive 9.1 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector and also enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits.

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End of the Chrétien Consensus? is a new book that examines the pro-growth policies of Prime Minister Jean Chrétien’s federal Liberal government, Premier Roy Romanow’s NDP government in Saskatchewan and Premier Ralph Klein’s Progressive Conservative government in Alberta. The foundation of economic prosperity that it created lasted for more than a decade.

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Myths of Infrastructure Spending in Canada

Myths of Infrastructure Spending in Canada finds that only 11 cents of every dollar in new federal government infrastructure spending will be spent on highways, bridges, railways and ports—projects that can actually help improve Canada’s economy. It also dispels other myths about infrastructure spending in Canada. For instance, it finds that governments have in fact significantly increased infrastructure spending over the past 15 years, and the value of Canada’s total infrastructure is currently at the highest level in four decades.

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Annual Survey of Mining Companies: 2016

The Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies, 2016, rates 104 jurisdictions around the world based on a combination of their geologic attractiveness for minerals and metals and their policy attractiveness. This year, Saskatchewan ranks as the top jurisdiction in the world, followed by Manitoba.