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The Economic Effects of Banning Temporary Replacement Workers

The Economic Effects of Banning Temporary Replacement Workers finds that prohibiting businesses from hiring temporary workers during strikes and lock-outs—as is the case in British Columbia and Quebec—discourages business investment, which in turn actually lowers union wages and costs jobs.

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Household Debt and Government Debt in Canada

Household Debt and Government Debt in Canada finds that, although household debt in Canada increased to more than $2 trillion in 2016—up from $357 billion in 1990—Canadian household assets (real estate, pensions, financial investments and equity in businesses, for example) also increased in value over the same time period to $12.3 trillion last year. But whereas recent increases in Canadian household debt have been accompanied by increases in net worth, the same cannot be said about government debt.

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A Friend in Need: Recognizing Alberta's Outsized Contribution to Confederation

A Friend in Need: Recognizing Alberta’s Outsized Contribution to Confederation finds that, between 2007 and 2015, Albertans contributed $221.4 billion more revenue to federal coffers than they received in federal transfer payments and services—a much larger net contribution than any other province.

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Ontario’s One Cylinder Economy: Housing in Toronto and Weak Business Investment finds that housing in the Toronto area—both homebuilding costs and record high prices—accounted for over a quarter (29.0 per cent) of Ontario’s income growth from 2015 to 2016. With the provincial economy increasingly dependent on Toronto’s housing market for growth, it is especially vulnerable if the market cools.

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Leaving Canada for Medical Care 2017

Leaving Canada for Medical Care, 2017 estimates that more than 60,000 Canadians received non-emergency medical treatment outside the country in 2016—an increase of nearly 40 per cent over 2015. Among the provinces, Ontario physicians reported the highest number of patients (26,513) leaving the country for treatment.

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Where Our Students are Educated 2017

Where Our Students are Educated: Measuring Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 finds that, as a share of all K-12 students, enrolment increased at independent schools in all provinces and decreased for public schools everywhere from 2000/01 to 2014/15. Across Canada, the share of students enrolled in independent schools in 2014/15 ranged from 12.9 per cent in B.C. to 0.8 per cent in New Brunswick.

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Incentives, Identity, and the Growth of Canada's Indigenous Population

Incentives, Identity, and the Growth of Canada’s Indigenous Population finds that Canada’s indigenous population increased by a staggering 275 per cent between 1986 and 2011—eight times faster than the general population—and is largely explained by so-called ethnic mobility as more and more Canadians start to identify as indigenous, and qualify for economic benefits.