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The Myth of Middle-Class Stagnation in Canada finds that Canada’s middle class, instead of stagnating economically, has actually seen its income increase by as much as 52 per cent since 1976, and the average Canadian worker also has to work far fewer hours to afford similar, although vastly improved common household goods such as televisions and cameras.

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Less Ottawa, More Province: How Decentralization Is Key to Health Care Reform

Less Ottawa, More Province: How Decentralization Is Key to Health Care Reform finds that, to fix Canada’s costly and under-performing health-care system, the federal government should learn from the welfare reforms of the 1990s that empowered provinces to lower costs while improving services. Last year, health-care costs consumed more than 40 per cent of provincial budgets on average, and they’re estimated to rise to more than 47 per cent by 2030.

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Independent Schools in British Columbia: Myths and Realities

Independent Schools in British Columbia: Myths and Realities finds that calls to eliminate funding for independent schools are based on misperceptions. In fact, more than 90 per cent of independent schools in B.C. are not elite preparatory institutions, and students in independent schools receive, on average, less than half the government funding per-pupil than students in public schools. Instead of taking away resources from public schools, cutting the partial funding independent schools receive could actually increase the financial strain on public schools and increase costs for B.C. taxpayers.

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Economic Freedom of the World: 2016 Annual Report

The Economic Freedom of the World: 2016 Annual Report is the world’s premier measurement of economic freedom, ranking countries based on five areas: size of government, legal structure and security of property rights, access to sound money, freedom to trade internationally, and regulation of credit, labour and business. This year’s report compares 159 countries and territories. In this year’s ranking, which is based on 2014 data, Hong Kong is again number one, Canada is tied for fifth, and the United States ranked 16th for the second year in a row.

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Consumption Inequality in Canada: Is the Gap Growing

Consumption Inequality in Canada: Is the Gap Growing? spotlights differences in consumption and income inequality since the late 1960s. It finds that despite alarmist claims to the contrary, when measuring consumption, the inequality gap in Canadians’ living standards has increased a paltry 3.4 per cent over the past 40 years. In fact, when income inequality statistics are properly measured (i.e. after taxes and adjusted for household size) the study finds income inequality has increased modestly by 11.5 percent.

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Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada

Education Spending and Public School Enrolment in Canada, 2016 Edition, finds that spending on public schools in Canada has increased dramatically over the past decade even as the number of students has declined. Across the country, spending on public schools increased more than 40 per cent, from $44.3 billion in 2004/2005 to nearly $62.6 billion in 2013/2014, a decade that saw a 4.2 per cent decline in the number of students enrolled in public schools in Canada. On a per-student basis, spending increased from $9,876 to $12,427 (after accounting for price changes), a dramatic 25.8 per cent increase over the same time.

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First-Past-the-Post: Empowered Voters, Accountable Government

First-Past-the-Post: Empowered Voters, Accountable Government, the third in a series of essays on electoral reform, spotlights several voting systems, including first-past-the-post (FPTP), preferential voting, and proportional representation systems like mixed-member proportional and single transferrable vote. It finds the benefits of first-past-the-post —simplicity, transparency and accountability —make it not only the best way of electing governments, but also the easiest way to defeat them by voting them out.

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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2016, finds that the average Canadian family spends more on taxes than on housing, food and clothing combined with 42 per cent of income going to taxes, and 38 per cent being spent on the basic necessities of life. The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2015, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.