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Why the Unemployment Rate is No Longer a Reliable Gauge of Labour Market Performance

Why the Unemployment Rate is No Longer a Reliable Gauge of Labour Market Performance finds that, as Canada’s population ages and more and more Canadians retire and exit the workforce, the employment rate is more reflective of Canada’s labour market. Despite a drop in the unemployment rate from 2008 to 2017, due in part to the shifting demographics, the employment rate also fell from during the same time from 63.4 per cent to 61.6 per cent, indicating declining employment levels.

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The Effect on Canadian Families of Changes to Federal Income Tax and CPP Payroll Tax

The Effect on Canadian Families of Changes to Federal Income Tax and CPP Payroll Tax finds that more than 92 per cent of all families in Canada with children—regardless of their income—will pay higher taxes because of Ottawa’s income tax changes and the increased Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, which will be fully implemented by 2025.

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Room to Grow: Comparing Urban Density in Canada and Abroad

Room to Grow: Comparing Urban Density in Canada and Abroad compares population densities in 30 metropolitan centres in high-income developed countries, and finds that Canadian cities—including Toronto and Vancouver, which are experiencing an affordability crunch—can accommodate much more housing supply as they have much lower population densities than other major urban centres around the world.

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CEO to Worker Pay: A Broader Examination

CEO to Worker Pay: A Broader Examination finds that despite sensational headlines about CEO salaries, top performers in many industries garner high levels of compensation, including sports and entertainment. For example, the NBA’s LeBron James made $77.2 million (US) in 2016, and actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson made $64.5 million (US). By comparison, the average compensation for the top 100 CEOs in Canada was $9.5 million.

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Economic Freedom of North America 2017

Economic Freedom of North America 2017 finds that New Hampshire—the Live Free or Die state—has the highest level of economic freedom among all U.S. states for the third year in a row, scoring 8.3 out of 10 in this year’s report, which measures government spending, taxation and labour market restrictions. Florida, Texas, South Dakota and Tennessee round out the top five freest states. For the third year in a row New York was the least-free state in the country at 50th, and California ranked 49th.

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Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index finds that the total amount donated to registered charities by Canadians—just 0.56 per cent of income—is the lowest amount in a decade and down from a 10-year peak of 0.78 per cent in 2006. By comparison, American tax-filers donated 1.76 per cent of their income to registered charities in 2015—more than three times the percentage Canadians claimed on their taxes.

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Report Card on Ontario's Elementary Schools 2017

The Report Card on Ontario’s Elementary Schools—now in its 15th year—ranks more than 3,000 anglophone and francophone public and Catholic schools (and a small number of independent schools) based on nine academic indicators from results of annual province-wide reading, writing and math tests.

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Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2017 Report

Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2017 finds that wait times for medically necessary treatment hit a new record in 2017 at 21.2 weeks—the longest ever recorded. The study, an annual survey of physicians from across Canada, finds Ontario again recorded the shortest wait time at 15.4 weeks—nearly four months—and New Brunswick recorded the longest wait time at 41.7 weeks.