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Canada’s Climate Action Plans: Are They Cost-effective?

Canada’s Climate Action Plans: Are they cost-effective? finds that current provincial plans will cost Canadians billions and likely produce very little environmental benefits, based on a detailed review of provincial climate action plans and results from countries and other jurisdictions around the world that have pursued similar policies.

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The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending

The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending finds that migrating seniors have increased B.C.’s health-care costs by more than $7.0 billion over the past 36 years, while effectively saving Quebec $6.0 billion. That’s because Canadians pay most of their lifetime taxes during their working lives, but consume most of their health-care costs after they retire. B.C. and five other provinces saw a net inflow of seniors since 1980, while Quebec and the other provinces saw a net outflow.

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Report Card on Quebec's Secondary Schools 2017

The Report Card on Quebec’s Secondary Schools 2017 ranks 455 public, private, Francophone and Anglophone schools based largely on the results from provincewide tests in French, English, science, mathematics and history. The Report Card provides parents and educators with objective information that’s difficult to find anywhere else, which is why it’s the go-to source for school performance in Quebec.

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Effect of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families Who Are in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners

Effect of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families Who Are in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners finds that the federal government’s tax changes, implemented since the 2015 election, have raised income taxes for the majority (61 per cent) of taxpaying Canadian families in the bottom 20 per cent of earners, which includes families with children with incomes up to $66,448.

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Uneven Recovery: Much of Ontario Still Hasn't Fully Recovered from the 2008 Recession

Uneven Recovery: Much of Ontario Still Hasn't Fully Recovered from the 2008 Recession finds that employment growth in Ontario since the recession has been heavily concentrated in the Greater Toronto and Ottawa areas, while many of the province’s other cities and towns are still struggling economically. In fact, 11 of the province’s 23 urban areas actually experienced net job losses from 2008 to 2016.

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Canada’s Aging Population and Implications for Government Finances

Canada’s Aging Population and Implications for Government Finances finds that the aging population will put significant stress on government spending programs and could increase deficits for federal and provincial governments to an estimated $143 billion by 2045—three and a half times larger than total federal and provincial government deficits in 2017.

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An Analysis of Federal Debt in Canada by Prime Ministers Since Confederation

An Analysis of Federal Debt in Canada by Prime Ministers Since Confederation tracks the debt legacies of every Canadian prime minister and finds that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is on track to increase per-person federal debt more than any other prime minister who didn’t face a world war or economic recession.

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Comparing the Family Income of Students in Alberta’s Independent and Public Schools

Comparing the Family Income of Students in Alberta’s Independent and Public Schools finds that despite common misperceptions, Alberta families with children in most independent schools actually have slightly lower incomes than families with children in public schools.