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Ontario Enters Uncharted Waters with a $15 Minimum Wage

Ontario Enters Uncharted Waters with a $15 Minimum Wage finds that raising Ontario’s minimum wage to $15 an hour—a staggering 32 per cent increase over the current minimum wage—will lead to job losses across the province for Ontario’s young and low-skilled workers, especially outside Toronto.

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The Debate about Métis Aboriginal Rights—Demography, Geography, and History

The Debate about Métis Aboriginal Rights—Demography, Geography, and History finds that, due to the ambiguity regarding who is—or isn’t—Métis, and what constitutes Métis land, current negotiations between Ottawa and several Métis associations may create more problems than they will solve.

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Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets

Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets finds that Ontario and Alberta, which once boasted of having strong fiscal records, are now among the country’s most unsuccessful financial managers. And Quebec and Saskatchewan, which have both struggled in the past as weak fiscal performers, are now pursuing policies that are gradually improving the condition of their public finances.

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Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 Edition

Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 finds that per-student spending in public schools increased in every province over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15), and across Canada, the average increase was 22.3 per cent (adjusted for inflation). In fact, education spending nationwide increased more than $17 billion, even though public school enrolment declined by 3.0 per cent over the same period.

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Understanding the Increases in Education Spending, 2017 Edition

Understanding the Increases in Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2017 finds that public school spending across Canada increased by $17.5 billion over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15) and nearly eight out of every 10 dollars of increased funding was spent on teacher and staff compensation, including salaries, benefits and pensions.

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Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States: 2017 Edition

Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States, 2017 finds that, overall, Canadian labour markets are being outperformed by their American counterparts with all but two Canadian provinces—Saskatchewan (15th) and B.C. (17th)—ranked in the bottom half of the 60 jurisdictions on the index.

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Measuring the Impact of the 2017 Election on Uncertainty in British Columbia

Measuring the Impact of the 2017 Election on Uncertainty in British Columbia finds that the tenuous nature of the recent provincial election in British Columbia has increased political and policy uncertainty to the highest levels since 2009, which could drive away business investment and slow the economy.

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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2017 finds that last year the average Canadian family paid twice as much of their income in taxes (42.5 per cent) as they did for housing (22.1 per cent). The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2016, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.