Alberta Prosperity

— Nov 22, 2018
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K-12 Education Reform in Alberta

K-12 Education Reform in Alberta finds that the Alberta government can improve K-12 education by implementing a series of reforms to both the public and independent school systems, including: experimenting with teacher incentive pay, allowing for-profit schools (as they do in Sweden), and relaxing the limits and restrictions on charter schools.

— Oct 23, 2018
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Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta

Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta finds that the province’s investment attractiveness has diminished in the eyes of oil, gas and mining executives, primarily due to the province’s increasing regulatory burden. Specifically, environmental regulations and the cost of complying with Alberta’s red tape are increasingly cited as reasons not to invest in the province.

— Sep 27, 2018
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Increasing the Minimum Wage in Alberta: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy

Increasing the Minimum Wage in Alberta: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy finds that raising Alberta’s minimum wage will do little to reduce poverty because 92 per cent of minimum-wage earners in the province don’t live in low-income households. In fact, half of the province’s minimum-wage earners are under the age of 24, almost all of whom live with their parents.

— Aug 30, 2018
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The Illusion of Alberta’s Jobs Recovery: Government vs. Private Sector Employment

The Illusion of Alberta’s Jobs Recovery: Government vs. Private Sector Employment finds that Alberta’s employment growth over the past four years is being driven by nearly 79,000 new government jobs, while the private sector has shed more than 46,000 jobs over the same period. In fact, from July 2014 to May 2018, the government sector’s share of total employment (excluding the self-employed) increased from 19.5 per cent to 23.2 per cent—the highest it’s been since 1994.

— Aug 8, 2018
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta finds that public-sector employees in Alberta—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 9.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

— May 24, 2018
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The Decline of the Other Alberta Advantage: Debt Service Costs in Alberta Are Rising

The Decline of the Other Alberta Advantage: Debt Service Costs in Alberta Are Rising finds that every Albertan will pay, on average, $442 this year in interest on the province’s growing debt, compared to just $58 a decade ago. And if the province’s debt trend continues, debt-servicing costs may exceed $1,000 per person within the next 10 years.

Alberta Prosperity Research Experts