Alberta Prosperity

— Feb 9, 2021
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Lessons for Fiscal Reform from the Klein Era

Lessons for Fiscal Reform from the Klein Era finds that today's Alberta government can learn some key lessons from the Klein reforms of the 1990s, which helped quickly eliminate the province's budget deficit and lay the foundation for more than a decade of surpluses.

— Dec 3, 2020
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The Great Convergence: Measuring the Fiscal Gap Between “Have” and “Have-Not” Provinces

The Great Convergence: Measuring the Fiscal Capacity Gap Between “Have” and “Have-Not” Provinces is a new study that finds the gap between the ability of Canada’s richer and poorer provinces to raise revenues is shrinking rapidly. If Alberta’s fiscal capacity gap continues to shrink relative to the rest of Canada, the province could soon become eligible for equalization transfers, which would affect transfers to other so-called “have not” provinces.

— Apr 28, 2020
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A Friend in Need: How Albertans Continue to Keep Federal Finances Afloat, 2020

A Friend in Need: How Albertans Continue to Keep Federal Finances Afloat, 2020 finds that from 2014 to 2018, Alberta’s net contribution to federal finances was $94.9 billion, by far the largest contribution from any province during that time period. Crucially, Ontario’s net contribution was $58.3 billion, but it’s population in 2018 was more than three times larger than Alberta’s. British Columbia was the only other net contributing province ($29.6 billion) during that time, meaning every other province received more from Ottawa than it sent to Ottawa.

— Feb 20, 2020
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Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates

Alberta’s Lost Advantage on Personal Income Tax Rates finds that the province’s top combined personal income tax rate is now more than 10 percentage points higher than the top rate in several other energy-producing jurisdictions. Whereas in 2014, Alberta’s top PIT rate was the lowest in North America, now it is the 10th highest following tax increases by the provincial and federal governments, and a reduction of the federal top rate in the U.S.

— Feb 19, 2020
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Interest Costs and their Growing Burden on Canadians

Interest Costs and their Growing Burden on Canadians finds that in fiscal year 2019-20, Ottawa will spend more than $24 billion on federal debt interest payments, as the federal debt has increased by more than $260 billion since the 2008-09 recession. The study also compares government debt interest costs among provinces.

— Jan 28, 2020
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Refining Alberta’s Equalization Gambit

Refining Alberta’s Equalization Gambit argues that, despite popular misconceptions (particularly in Central Canada), Alberta can compel other provinces and the federal government to negotiate aspects of the Constitution including equalization. The essay cites past Supreme Court judgments and germane sections of the Constitution Act, 1982.

Alberta Prosperity Research Experts