Alberta Prosperity

— Apr 3, 2019
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Albertans Make Disproportionate Contributions to National Programs: The Canada Pension Plan as a Case Study

Albertans Make Disproportionate Contributions to National Programs: The Canada Pension Plan as a Case Study finds that in 2017, workers in Alberta paid $2.9 billion more into the Canada Pension Plan than Alberta retirees received in CPP payments. In fact, from 2008 to 2017, the total net contribution to the CPP from Albertan workers—the amount over and above what Alberta retirees were paid—was a staggering $27.9 billion. Ontario, the next highest contributing province, had a net contribution of just $7.4 billion over the same decade.

— Mar 14, 2019
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Alberta Prosperity: A Plan for Opportunity and Growth is a new book by the Fraser Institute that explores reforms in crucial policy areas, including Alberta’s finances, the health-care and education systems, the investment climate and resource regulation in the province, among others. The book provides policymakers with a clear plan to improve competitiveness, which would help attract entrepreneurs, investors and businesses, and raise living standards for Albertans.

— Mar 14, 2019
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A Spending Framework for Alberta: Balancing the Need for Deficit Elimination and Tax Reform

A Spending Framework for Alberta: Balancing the Need for Deficit Elimination and Tax Reform finds that the Alberta government could balance its budget by 2021/22—and create the fiscal room for much-needed tax relief—if program spending were cut by 10.9 per cent over the next three years. While a 10.9 per cent spending reduction would be significant, it is substantially smaller than the reductions implemented by the Klein government in the 1990s. It would also bring Alberta’s per-person spending closer into line with neighbouring British Columbia, which currently spends 21 per cent less per person than Alberta does.

— Feb 27, 2019
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Carbon Pricing in Alberta

Carbon Pricing in Alberta finds that the province’s carbon tax is unlikely to meaningfully reduce global carbon emissions. Crucially, Alberta’s carbon tax doesn’t replace existing regulations, is not revenue neutral and the government plans to continue subsidizing carbon-emitting alternatives, all of which distort the market pressures a tax would place on emissions, thus negating the theoretical benefits of a pricing scheme.

— Feb 5, 2019
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Health Care Reform Options for Alberta

Health Care Reform Options for Alberta finds that the Alberta government can enact major health-care reforms—without contravening the Canada Health Act—that would shorten wait times and improve patient care. For example, increasing the use of private clinics, creating a centralized surgical registry and pooling patient referrals, and allowing private, parallel financing and delivery of medically necessary services, none of which are explicitly prohibited by federal legislation.

— Jan 29, 2019
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Restoring a Competitive Labour Market in Alberta

Restoring a Competitive Labour Market in Alberta: Examining Right-to-Work and Other Policy Changes finds that, in light of Alberta’s continuing economic challenges and the rise of competing jurisdictions such as Texas and North Dakota, making the province’s labour market more competitive could improve economic growth and benefit Alberta workers.

Alberta Prosperity Research Experts