BC Prosperity

— Aug 29, 2017
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Measuring the Impact of the 2017 Election on Uncertainty in British Columbia

Measuring the Impact of the 2017 Election on Uncertainty in British Columbia finds that the tenuous nature of the recent provincial election in British Columbia has increased political and policy uncertainty to the highest levels since 2009, which could drive away business investment and slow the economy.

— Jun 14, 2017
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Impact of Proposed NDP-Green Tax Changes on BC Families

The Impact of Proposed NDP-Green Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average B.C. family’s tax bill would increase by $594 under an NDP-Green government, led mainly by a $482 increase in fuel and carbon taxes.

— May 13, 2017
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Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2017

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2017 ranks 293 public and independent secondary schools based on seven academic indicators using student results from annual provincewide exams, grade-to-grade transition rates, and graduation rates.

— Apr 27, 2017
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New Homes and Red Tape in British Columbia 2017

New Homes and Red Tape in British Columbia: Residential Land-Use Regulation in the Lower Mainland finds that The City of Vancouver is the most heavily regulated municipality in the Lower Mainland for residential development and is stifling new homebuilding. The survey of homebuilders ranks 19 of the region’s municipalities when it comes to residential development regulations.

— Mar 30, 2017
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Comparing the Family Income of Students in BC

Comparing the Family Income of Students in British Columbia's Independent and Public Schools finds that, despite common misperceptions, families with children attending non-elite independent schools in British Columbia have essentially the same level of income as families with children in public schools.

— Feb 16, 2017
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Examining the Revenue Neutrality of British Columbia's Carbon Tax

Examining the Revenue Neutrality of British Columbia’s Carbon Tax finds that the tax is no longer revenue neutral, and could actually result in almost $900 million in higher taxes over a six-year period. These findings are especially important given the federal government’s requirement on the provinces to adopt a carbon pricing system by 2018, and the fact that proponents often tout B.C.’s carbon tax as a model to follow, in part because of its alleged revenue neutrality.

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BC Prosperity Research Experts

  • Director, Provincial Prosperity Studies, Fraser Institute
  • Director, Fiscal Studies, Fraser Institute
  • President, Fraser Institute
  • Chairman, Fraser Institute Foundation & Founding Executive Director of the Fraser Institute