BC Prosperity

— Mar 14, 2019
Printer-friendly version
Report Card on British Columbia's Elementary Schools 2019

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Elementary Schools, 2019 ranks 955 public and independent elementary schools based on 10 academic indicators derived from the provincewide Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA) results. The report card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else: In addition to five years of academic results, the report card shows which schools are improving or falling behind.

— Jan 29, 2019
Printer-friendly version
Assessing British Columbia's Tax Competitiveness

Assessing British Columbia’s Tax Competitiveness finds that B.C. now has the ninth highest top combined personal income tax rate in Canada and the United States, which hurts the province’s ability to compete with neighbouring jurisdictions for skilled-workers and investment. The province also has the highest taxes on business investment anywhere in Canada.

— Nov 15, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High

Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High finds that drivers in British Columbia pay higher rates, in part, because ICBC doesn’t fully account for age when setting rates, so older, safer drivers pay more to subsidize younger, riskier drivers, who pay less than they otherwise would. Also, ICBC uses driver premiums to pay for non-insurance related costs—such as driver testing, driver and vehicle licensing and fine collection—which also drive up costs.

— Oct 18, 2018
Printer-friendly version
The Consequences of Electoral Reform in British Columbia

The Consequences of Electoral Reform in British Columbia finds that changing the province’s voting system to a form of proportional representation, or PR, would lead to bigger costlier provincial governments. In fact, governments elected under PR systems are nearly 30 per cent bigger than governments elected under first-past-the-post, based on election data from 26 countries between 2004 and 2015 (the most recent year of comparable data).

— Sep 19, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families

Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average family in British Columbia—with a 2018 household income of $114,809—will pay $969 more a year in taxes due to the B.C. government’s recent tax changes. Crucially, that figure does not include several residential property tax increases, such as the increased property transfer taxes, the foreign buyers tax, the speculation tax and the school tax.

— Aug 23, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 Edition

Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 finds that the City of Vancouver spent 84 per cent more, per resident, and collected 61 per cent higher per resident revenues in 2016 than Surrey, the next largest municipality by population in the region. The study compares 17 of the Metro Vancouver Regional District’s 21 municipalities on several measures—including government spending, revenue and debt—from 2007 to 2016, the most recent year of available data.

BC Prosperity Research Experts

  • Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute
  • President, Fraser Institute
  • Chairman, Fraser Institute Foundation & Founding Executive Director of the Fraser Institute