Deficits & Debt

— Jan 4, 2024
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British Columbia's Coming Debt Boom in Historical Context

British Columbia’s Coming Debt Boom in Historical Context is a new study that finds over the next three years, the BC government plans to add a total of $35.6 billion in new debt (adjusting for both inflation and financial assets). This compares with additional debt of $9.9 billion after the pandemic and $17.8 billion after the financial crisis of 2008/09.

— Oct 17, 2023
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It’s Time to Get Off the Resource Revenue Rollercoaster

There’s time to get off the resource revenue rollercoaster: Re-establishing the Alberta Sustainability Fund is a new study that finds with spending restraint, Alberta can re-introduce a rainy-day fund worth $9.8 billion by 2025/26 that could help insulate the province’s budget from swings in resource revenue.

— Aug 10, 2023
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Spending Growth Is the Cause of BC’s Coming Debt Boom

Spending Growth is the Cause of BC’s Coming Debt Boom is a new study that finds from 2000-2017 per person program spending in BC increased by 8.4 per cent (adjusted for inflation), but more recently, and in a much shorter time period from 2017 to 2022—even excluding COVID spending—per person spending increased by 25.9 per cent.

— Jul 5, 2023
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No Sign of Significant Debt Reduction or Tax Relief in Ford’s Spring 2023 Budget – It’s All Spend, Spend, Spend!

No Sign of Significant Debt Reduction or Tax Relief in Ford’s Spring 2023 Budget—It’s All Spend, Spend, Spend! is a new study that details what the current Ontario government could have achieved in terms of lower taxes, surpluses and debt relief if it had maintained the spending levels of the previous Wynne government. Instead, the current government has increased spending by $9.5 billion above the average (inflation adjusted) annual spending of its predecessor, and is forecasting a $1.3 billion deficit this year.

— May 2, 2023
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How Provincial Governments Respond to Fiscal Shocks and Federal Transfers

How Provincial Governments Respond to Fiscal Shocks and Federal Transfers is a new study that finds despite misperceptions that government deficits have no cost, higher deficit-financed spending by provincial governments over the past 50 years has, in fact, led to higher taxes and higher debt-servicing costs for taxpayers.

— Mar 16, 2023
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Stress Testing the Federal Fiscal Anchor

Stress Testing the Federal Fiscal Anchor finds that that there is a 30 per cent chance that the federal debt to GDP ratio will increase over a 10-year time period, meaning the federal government would fail to achieve its core fiscal goal.