Energy

— Aug 22, 2019
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The Impact of the Federal Carbon Tax on the Competitiveness of Canadian Industries finds that the federal carbon tax will increase production costs in key sectors and could trigger a phenomenon known as “carbon leakage”—where firms relocate industrial activity (including petroleum and coal-product manufacturing) to countries with less-stringent climate policies.

— Jul 30, 2019
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Generating Electricity in Canada from Wind and Sunlight: Is Getting Less for More Better than Getting More for Less?

Generating Electricity in Canada from Wind and Sunlight: Is Getting Less for More Better than Getting More for Less? is a new study that finds, despite rhetoric that renewable energy is cheap, wind and solar power generation actually comes with large—yet often ignored—costs that increase electricity prices for residents and businesses. And generating electricity from variable renewable energy sources, such as wind and sunlight, benefits the environment less than advocates claim.

— Jul 18, 2019
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Assessing Canada's Energy Sector Competitiveness: Collected Essays

Assessing Canada’s Energy Sector Competitiveness is a new collection of essays that highlights how several government policies have weakened Canada’s ability to attract investment in the energy sector, all the while investment in the United States has soared.

— May 7, 2019
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Investment in the Canadian and U.S. Oil and Gas Sectors: A Tale of Diverging Fortunes

Investment in the Canadian and U.S. Oil and Gas Sectors: A Tale of Diverging Fortunes finds that from 2016 to 2018, capital investment in Canada’s upstream oil and gas industry (essentially, exploration and production) increased only 15 per cent compared to 41 per cent in the U.S. over the same period. And, the percentage of oil and gas capital investment in Canada as a share of total capital investment has plummeted, from 28 per cent in 2014 to 13.9 per cent in 2018.

— Apr 30, 2019
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The Cost of Pipeline Constraints in Canada, 2019 finds that a lack of pipeline capacity in Canada is driving down the price of Canadian oil and cost the country’s energy sector C$20.6 billion in foregone revenues last year, even after adjusting for quality differences and transportation costs. In fact, the revenue loss in 2018 nearly eclipsed the amount for the previous five years combined (2013 to 2017) when Canada’s pipeline shortage cost our energy sector $20.7 billion.

— Mar 5, 2019
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Effective Tax and Royalty Rates on New Investment in Oil and Gas after Canadian and American Tax Reform

Effective Tax and Royalty Rates on New Investment in Oil and Gas after Canadian and American Tax Reform finds that, despite the federal government’s recent (albeit temporary) investment incentive measures, the effective tax rate on new investment in the oil and gas sectors are uncompetitive in two of Canada’s major energy-producing provinces: Saskatchewan and B.C. In fact, Saskatchewan has the highest taxes on new investment in both oil and gas among all major energy-producing jurisdictions in North America, and B.C. has the second-highest tax rate on new gas investments in Canada.

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