Government Spending

— Jan 31, 2019
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Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada: 2019 Edition

Education Spending and Public School Enrolment in Canada, 2019 finds that spending on public schools across Canada increased in every province over the past decade by an average of 17.3 per cent, on a per-student basis, after adjusting for inflation. Nominally, spending increased from about $49 billion in 2006/07 to nearly $65 billion in 2015/16, the most recent year of available Statistics Canada data. Teacher and staff compensation (salaries, pensions and benefits) accounted for 84 per cent of that increased spending, rising from $35 billion to more than $48 billion over the same 10-year period.

— Jan 22, 2019
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Prime Ministers and Government Spending, 2019 tracks annual per person program spending (adjusted for inflation) by prime ministers since Confederation, and finds that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has now recorded two of the three years with the highest levels of government spending in Canadian history, including times of war and recession. The all-time high was recorded by Prime Minister Stephen Harper during the 2009 recession.

— Oct 11, 2018
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Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison

Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison finds that Canada’s anemic growth rate of capital investment—which has slowed to a 40-year low—has lagged behind growth rates in the United States and other developed countries in recent years. Investment growth has been especially weak in Canada’s business sector, particularly in the areas of machinery, equipment and intellectual property.

— Sep 13, 2018
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Capital Investment in Canada: Recent Behaviour and Implications

Capital Investment in Canada: Recent Behaviour and Implications finds that the growth rate of overall investments in Canada—particularly in the important areas of equipment, machinery and intellectual property—has slowed to a 40-year low, negatively affecting living standards for workers and overall economic growth.

— Mar 22, 2018
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Subsidized Daycare—What British Columbia Can Learn from Quebec’s 20-Year Experiment

Subsidized Daycare—What British Columbia Can Learn from Quebec’s 20-Year Experiment finds that policymakers in B.C. should learn from Quebec’s government-subsidized daycare program, which has proven costly for taxpayers, has not paid for itself and has experienced mixed child development outcomes.

— Feb 23, 2018
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Back on Track: How the Federal Liberals Can Deliver Their Promised Balanced Budget by 2019/20

Back on Track: How the Federal Liberals Can Deliver Their Promised Balanced Budget by 2019/20 finds that a modest one per cent reduction in program spending—spread out over two years—would achieve budget balance. Incidentally, since coming into office in 2015, the federal Liberals have increased program spending by 20.1 per cent ($51 billion) in just three years.

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