Government Spending

— May 3, 2022
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Polling Canadians’ Support for New Federal Government Programs

Polling Canadians’ Support for New Federal Government Programs is a new study, based on a Leger poll commissioned by the Fraser Institute, that finds support for national dental care, pharmacare and $10-a-day daycare drops significantly when tax increases are included, specifically GST hikes. In fact, 4-in-10 Canadians (or less) support the new programs introduced or committed to in the recent federal budget if the GST were increased in order to pay for them.

— Mar 17, 2022
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The Size of Government in Canada in 2019

The Size of Government in Canada in 2019 is a new study that finds the size of government across Canada was on the rise even before the COVID-19 pandemic and recession. In fact, relative to the size of the provincial economies, the size of government increased in all but two provinces over the 2007 to 2019 period.

— Mar 1, 2022
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Ottawa’s Pattern of Excessive Spending and Persistent Deficits

Ottawa’s Pattern of Excessive Spending and Persistent Deficits is a new study that finds between 2015/16 and 2019/20, the federal government ran five consecutive deficits, causing the federal debt to rise by $112.2 billion—all prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, weakening federal finances as Canada headed into it.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 5.6 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of Alberta’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040/41 unless it makes changes to its spending.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in the Prairies

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in the Prairies is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in Saskatchewan and Manitoba will increase by an estimated 5.4 per cent and 4.9 per cent annually (respectively, on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of the provinces’ changing demographics, they may not balance their budgets until at least 2040/41 unless changes to spending are made.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Atlantic Canada

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Atlantic Canada is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the region will increase 4.2 per cent in New Brunswick, 4.7 per cent in Nova Scotia, 5.1 per cent in Newfoundland & Labrador, and 5.6 per cent in Prince Edward Island annually (on average) over the next 20 years. As a result of the region’s changing demographics, none may balance their budget until at least 2040/41 unless changes are made to spending.

Government Spending Research Experts