Government Spending

— Mar 25, 2021
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Aging and Expenditures on Health Care

Aging and Expenditures on Health Care is a new study that finds Canadians over the age of 65, who are projected to make up 23.4 per cent of the population by 2040, will account for 71.4 per cent of total health care expenditures in that year. And in fact, health care spending is projected to grow by 88 per cent from 2019 to 2040 as a result of the growing number of Canadians aged 65 and older.

— Mar 2, 2021
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Reforming Employment Insurance for the 21st Century

Reforming Employment Insurance for the 21st Century analyzes problems with Canada’s EI system, such as providing unequal benefits depending on where a worker lives, and not covering the self-employed or those who work in the growing ‘gig’ economy. The study also highlights several ways Canada’s employment insurance system could be reformed, including the idea of an Unemployment Insurance Savings Account.

— Feb 25, 2021
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Federal and Provincial Debt-Interest Costs for Canadians

Federal and Provincial Debt-Interest Costs for Canadians is a new study that finds taxpayers across Canada will pay a total of $49.6 billion—or about $4 billion a month—in interest payments for the federal and provincial debts this year alone. Even provinces that recently had low interest costs, such as Alberta, have lost this advantage due to years of mounting debt and deficits.

— Feb 17, 2021
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Atlantic Canada's Precarious Public Finances

Atlantic Canada’s Precarious Public Finances finds that the financial positions of the four Atlantic provinces are unsustainable, and they will face rising debt-to-GDP ratios in the coming years in the absence of policy changes or improved economic growth. Crucially, the Atlantic provinces’ finances are more vulnerable than those in other provinces because of a number of economic and demographic factors in the region, such as an older population, high tax and interest rates, and a greater dependency on federal transfers from Ottawa.

— Feb 11, 2021
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Comparing Economic Performance in Five Pre-Recession Periods is a new study that compares numerous economic indicators relating to income growth, labour markets and business investment for the last five pre-recessionary periods: 1986-1989, 1997-2000, 2005-2008, 2011-2014, and 2016-2019. On almost all of the measures included in the analysis, the economic performance from 2016 to 2019 (the years preceding the COVID-19 recession) was the weakest.

— Jan 28, 2021
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Fiscal Federalism and the Dependency of Atlantic Canada

Fiscal Federalism and the Dependency of Atlantic Canada is a new study that examines Atlantic Canada’s dependency on fiscal transfers from Ottawa, and highlights how the region is vulnerable to any significant changes in fiscal federalism. The study finds that from 2007 to 2019, federal spending (including Employment Insurance, equalization, health care, and various other subsidies and programs) in Atlantic Canada equaled more than a quarter—27.5 per cent—of the region’s economy

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