Government Spending

— Nov 23, 2017
Printer-friendly version
The Age of Eligibility for Public Retirement Programs in the OECD

The Age of Eligibility for Public Retirement Programs in the OECD finds that Canada is out of step with most major industrialized countries—and the other G7 nations—which are increasing the age of eligibility for public retirement programs. In fact, of the 22 high-income industrialized countries (apart from Canada) in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), 18 of them—82 per cent—are increasing the age of eligibility for government retirement programs.

— Nov 21, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Bending the Curve: Recent Developments in Government Spending on First Nations

Bending the Curve: Recent Developments in Government Spending on First Nations finds that First Nations across Canada are generating billions in revenue for themselves—and not only from natural resources. According to the study, the average own-source revenue total for approximately 80 per cent of all First Nations in Canada (those with publicly available data) was $5.9 million in 2015/16.

— Nov 15, 2017
Printer-friendly version
The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending

The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending finds that migrating seniors have increased B.C.’s health-care costs by more than $7.0 billion over the past 36 years, while effectively saving Quebec $6.0 billion. That’s because Canadians pay most of their lifetime taxes during their working lives, but consume most of their health-care costs after they retire. B.C. and five other provinces saw a net inflow of seniors since 1980, while Quebec and the other provinces saw a net outflow.

— Oct 31, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Canada’s Aging Population and Implications for Government Finances

Canada’s Aging Population and Implications for Government Finances finds that the aging population will put significant stress on government spending programs and could increase deficits for federal and provincial governments to an estimated $143 billion by 2045—three and a half times larger than total federal and provincial government deficits in 2017.

— Sep 7, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets

Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets finds that Ontario and Alberta, which once boasted of having strong fiscal records, are now among the country’s most unsuccessful financial managers. And Quebec and Saskatchewan, which have both struggled in the past as weak fiscal performers, are now pursuing policies that are gradually improving the condition of their public finances.

— Sep 6, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 Edition

Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 finds that per-student spending in public schools increased in every province over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15), and across Canada, the average increase was 22.3 per cent (adjusted for inflation). In fact, education spending nationwide increased more than $17 billion, even though public school enrolment declined by 3.0 per cent over the same period.

Subscribe to Government Spending

Government Spending Research Experts