Bruce Pardy

Bruce Pardy is a professor of law at Queen’s University. He has written extensively on environmental governance, ecosystem management, climate change, water policy and civil liability. His research focuses on the theoretical and principled foundations of environmental law, challenging orthodoxies found within that discipline. Professor Pardy has taught environmental law at law schools in Canada, the United States and New Zealand. He practiced litigation at Borden Ladner Gervais LLP in Toronto, and served for almost a decade as an adjudicator and mediator on the Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal.

Recent Research by Bruce Pardy

— Jun 28, 2018
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Protecting Government from Free Trade: The “Free the Beer” Case at the Supreme Court of Canada

Protecting Government from Free Trade: The “Free the Beer” Case at the Supreme Court of Canada argues that the Court effectively nullified section 121 of the Constitution, which states that goods from any province shall be “admitted free into each of the other provinces.” As a result, provincial governments may raise barriers to any products—including beer and wine—from any other province as long as they can identify a regulatory objective in the public interest.

— May 31, 2018
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Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment

Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment finds that environmental assessments for resource development projects, such as oil and gas pipelines, have always been arbitrary and political, and the federal government’s proposed reforms—contained in Bill C-69—do nothing to change that. If anything, the changes may increase uncertainty in the project approval process.

— Dec 20, 2016
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Does Constitutional Protection Prevent Education Reform in Ontario?

Does Constitutional Protection Prevent Education Reform in Ontario? finds that Ontario’s Catholic school system can be part of education reform, despite public misperceptions about the nature of its protection in the Constitution. Amending constitutional provisions that only apply to one province require a simple vote in the legislature of the affected province, and recognition by the federal Parliament.