Hugh MacIntyre

Senior Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Hugh MacIntyre is a Senior Policy Analyst at the Fraser Institute. He holds an M.Sc. in Political Science from the University of Edinburgh, a Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Economics from Simon Fraser University, and an Honours B.A. from the University of Toronto. Mr. MacIntyre has published over 25 studies and has written over 80 original commentaries appearing in national and regional media outlets including the Globe & Mail and the National Post. His research covers a wide range of economic policy issues including taxation, government finances, government performance, public-private partnerships, labour policy, income mobility, poverty, and charitable giving.

Recent Research by Hugh MacIntyre

— Aug 31, 2017
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Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States: 2017 Edition

Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States, 2017 finds that, overall, Canadian labour markets are being outperformed by their American counterparts with all but two Canadian provinces—Saskatchewan (15th) and B.C. (17th)—ranked in the bottom half of the 60 jurisdictions on the index.

— Jul 25, 2017
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The Economic Effects of Banning Temporary Replacement Workers

The Economic Effects of Banning Temporary Replacement Workers finds that prohibiting businesses from hiring temporary workers during strikes and lock-outs—as is the case in British Columbia and Quebec—discourages business investment, which in turn actually lowers union wages and costs jobs.

— Mar 2, 2017
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Myths of Infrastructure Spending in Canada

Myths of Infrastructure Spending in Canada finds that only 11 cents of every dollar in new federal government infrastructure spending will be spent on highways, bridges, railways and ports—projects that can actually help improve Canada’s economy. It also dispels other myths about infrastructure spending in Canada. For instance, it finds that governments have in fact significantly increased infrastructure spending over the past 15 years, and the value of Canada’s total infrastructure is currently at the highest level in four decades.