Joel Emes

Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is Fraser Institute Senior Fellow who rejoined the Institute after a stint as a senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. He previously served as a senior analyst, then as executive director (2009 to 2011), at the BC Progress Board. Prior to that, Joel was a senior research economist at the Fraser Institute, where he initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— Aug 22, 2017
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Should Equalization Keep On Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity

Should Equalization Keep on Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity? finds that, as traditional “have” provinces struggle economically, Canada’s equalization program is not equipped to adapt to the country’s new economic landscape. In fact, a rule introduced to cap equalization increases to ensure program affordability could actually add as much as $2.7 billion to program costs over the next two years.

— Mar 30, 2017
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Comparing the Family Income of Students in BC

Comparing the Family Income of Students in British Columbia's Independent and Public Schools finds that, despite common misperceptions, families with children attending non-elite independent schools in British Columbia have essentially the same level of income as families with children in public schools.

— Mar 14, 2017
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Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017

The Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017 finds that health-care spending by provincial governments has increased by 116 per cent since 2001 and is projected to keep growing over the next 15 years. In fact, by 2031, health-care spending is projected to consume 42.6 per cent of all provincial program spending (on average), up from 40.1 per cent in 2016 and 37.6 percent in 2001.