Joel Emes

Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is Fraser Institute Senior Fellow who rejoined the Institute after a stint as a senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. He previously served as a senior analyst, then as executive director (2009 to 2011), at the BC Progress Board. Prior to that, Joel was a senior research economist at the Fraser Institute, where he initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— Sep 6, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 Edition

Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 finds that per-student spending in public schools increased in every province over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15), and across Canada, the average increase was 22.3 per cent (adjusted for inflation). In fact, education spending nationwide increased more than $17 billion, even though public school enrolment declined by 3.0 per cent over the same period.

— Sep 6, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Understanding the Increases in Education Spending, 2017 Edition

Understanding the Increases in Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2017 finds that public school spending across Canada increased by $17.5 billion over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15) and nearly eight out of every 10 dollars of increased funding was spent on teacher and staff compensation, including salaries, benefits and pensions.

— Aug 22, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Should Equalization Keep On Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity

Should Equalization Keep on Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity? finds that, as traditional “have” provinces struggle economically, Canada’s equalization program is not equipped to adapt to the country’s new economic landscape. In fact, a rule introduced to cap equalization increases to ensure program affordability could actually add as much as $2.7 billion to program costs over the next two years.