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Milagros Palacios

Senior Research Economist, Fraser Institute

Milagros Palacios is a Senior Research Economist at the Fraser Institute. She holds a B.A. in Industrial Engineering from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and a M.Sc. in Economics from the University of Concepcion, Chile. Ms. Palacios has studied public policy involving taxation, government finances, investment, productivity, labour markets, and charitable giving, for nearly 10 years. Since joining the Institute, Ms. Palacios has authored or coauthored over 70 comprehensive research studies, 70 commentaries and four books. Her recent commentaries have appeared in major Canadian newspapers such as the National Post, Toronto Sun, Windsor Star, and Vancouver Sun.

Recent Research by Milagros Palacios

— Jan 12, 2017
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia finds that government workers in B.C. receive 7.4 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector, and enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits, too. For example, nine-in-ten public sector workers have defined benefit pension plans, compared to just one-in-ten in the private sector. And government workers retire, on average, 2.5 years earlier.

— Jan 5, 2017
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The End of the Alberta Tax Advantage finds that corporate and personal income tax hikes in Alberta last year have wiped away the crucial tax advantage that helped fuel the province’s economic prosperity for years. Corporate tax rates are now lower in B.C., Ontario and Quebec, and Alberta’s top combined marginal personal income tax rate went from the lowest in North America to the 16th highest among all province and states.

— Dec 8, 2016
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Canada

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Canada finds that government workers in Canada get 10.6 per cent higher pay than comparable private-sector workers and also enjoy more generous benefits—including earlier retirement, more personal leave, more job security and better pensions.