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Milagros Palacios

Senior Research Economist, Fraser Institute

Milagros Palacios is a Senior Research Economist at the Fraser Institute. She holds a B.A. in Industrial Engineering from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and a M.Sc. in Economics from the University of Concepcion, Chile. Ms. Palacios has studied public policy involving taxation, government finances, investment, productivity, labour markets, and charitable giving, for nearly 10 years. Since joining the Institute, Ms. Palacios has authored or coauthored over 70 comprehensive research studies, 70 commentaries and four books. Her recent commentaries have appeared in major Canadian newspapers such as the National Post, Toronto Sun, Windsor Star, and Vancouver Sun.

Recent Research by Milagros Palacios

— May 11, 2017
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Prime Ministers and Government Spending

Prime Ministers and Government Spending: A Retrospective finds that this year, federal per person program spending under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has nearly eclipsed the all-time high recorded during the 2009 recession. But unlike most marked increases in program spending over Canada's 150-year history, this year's historically high level of spending comes in the absence of a recession or war.

— Mar 30, 2017
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Hold the Celebration

Hold the Celebration: A Balanced Budget Won’t End Ontario’s Fiscal Challenges finds that Ontario’s debt is expected to continue to grow—increasing by approximately $9 billion next year—despite the government’s promise to finally balance its budget next month. Currently, Ontario’s debt relative to the size of the provincial economy stands at approximately 40 per cent and is expected to hover close to this historically high level for the foreseeable future.

— Mar 14, 2017
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Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017

The Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017 finds that health-care spending by provincial governments has increased by 116 per cent since 2001 and is projected to keep growing over the next 15 years. In fact, by 2031, health-care spending is projected to consume 42.6 per cent of all provincial program spending (on average), up from 40.1 per cent in 2016 and 37.6 percent in 2001.