Philip Cross

Philip Cross spent 36 years at Statistics Canada, the last few years as its Chief Economic Analyst. He wrote Statistics Canada's monthly assessment of the economy for years, as well as many feature articles for the Canadian Economic Observer. After leaving Statistics Canada, he worked for the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. He is a member of the Business Cycle Dating Committee at the CD Howe Institute. He has been widely-quoted over the years, and now writes a bi-weekly column for the National Post and other papers.

Recent Research by Philip Cross

— Oct 12, 2017
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Business Investment in Canada Falls Far Behind Other Industrialized Countries

Business Investment in Canada Falls Far Behind Other Industrialized Countries finds that Canada trails other developed countries when it comes to levels of business investment, which is critical to grow the economy and increase living standards. In fact, Canada is 16th out of 17 developed countries when it comes to business investment as a share of GDP, and 15th of 17 for business investment per worker.

— Jul 5, 2017
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Ontario’s One Cylinder Economy: Housing in Toronto and Weak Business Investment finds that housing in the Toronto area—both homebuilding costs and record high prices—accounted for over a quarter (29.0 per cent) of Ontario’s income growth from 2015 to 2016. With the provincial economy increasingly dependent on Toronto’s housing market for growth, it is especially vulnerable if the market cools.

— Oct 18, 2016
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The Importance of International Trade to the Canadian Economy: An Overview

With strong opposition to trade emerging in the U.S. presidential election and in Europe, The Importance of International Trade to the Canadian Economy: An Overview finds that the value of goods and services produced in Canada and sold abroad (exports) accounted for 31.5 per cent of Canada’s economy in 2015—up from 25 per cent in 1988—and some three million jobs in Canada are directly or indirectly tied with exporting.