Steven Globerman

Director, Center for International Business, Western Washington University

Mr. Steven Globerman is the Kaiser Professor of International Business and Director of the Center for International Business at Western Washington University, and Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute. Previously, he held tenured appointments at Simon Fraser University and York University and has been a visiting professor at the University of California, University of British Columbia, Stockholm School of Economics, Copenhagen School of Business, and the Helsinki School of Economics.

He has published more than 150 articles and monographs and is the author of the book The Impacts of 9/11 on Canada-U.S. Trade as well as a textbook on international business management. In the early 1990s, he was responsible for coordinating Fraser Institute research on the North American Free Trade Agreement.

In addition, Mr. Globerman has served as a researcher for two Canadian Royal Commissions on the economy as well as a research advisor to Investment Canada on the subject of foreign direct investment. He has also hosted management seminars for policymakers across North America and Asia.

Mr. Globerman was a founding member of the Association for Cultural Economics and is currently a member of the American and Canadian Economics Associations, the Academy of International Business, and the Academy of Management.

He earned his BA in economics from Brooklyn College, his MA from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD from New York University.

Recent Research by Steven Globerman

— Aug 15, 2017
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The Fate of NAFTA: Possible Scenarios and their Implications for Canada

The Fate of NAFTA: Possible Scenarios and their Implications for Canada finds that Canada may have to eliminate protectionist policies aimed at key Canadian industries to successfully renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in upcoming trade talks—and that could be good news for the Canadian economy in the longer-run.

— Oct 14, 2016
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Intellectual Property Rights and the Promotion of Biologics, Medical Devices, and Trade in Pharmaceuticals

Intellectual Property Rights and the Promotion of Biologics, Medical Devices, and Trade in Pharmaceuticals finds that if patent protections for drugs and medical devices were strengthened around the world, it could ultimately lower costs in Canada and help save lives by spurring innovation. And until stronger patent protections are established around the world, developed countries should streamline cross-border regulations for pharmaceuticals and medical devices, which would help reduce prices for patients and health-care systems.

— May 25, 2016
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Technological Change and Its Implications for Regulating Canada's Television Broadcasting Sector

Technological Change and Its Implications for Regulating Canada’s Television Broadcasting Sector finds that the low-cost methods of creating and distributing broadcasting content means that the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) traditional policies to protect and subsidize Canadian content are increasingly unsustainable.