Taylor Jackson

Senior Policy Analyst, Centre for Natural Resource Studies, Fraser Institute

Taylor Jackson is a Senior Policy Analyst in the Centre for Natural Resource Studies at the Fraser Institute. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from Simon Fraser University. Mr. Jackson is the coauthor of a number of Fraser Institute studies, including Safety in the Transportation of Oil and Gas: Pipelines or Rail?, and the Fraser Institute's annual Global Petroleum Survey, and Survey of Mining Companies. He is also the coauthor of a book chapter on the past, present, and future of Canadian-American relations with Professor Alexander Moens. Mr Jackson's work has been covered in the media all around the world and his commentaries have appeared in the National Post, Financial Post, and Washington Times, as well as other newspapers across Canada.

Recent Research by Taylor Jackson

— Feb 28, 2017
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Annual Survey of Mining Companies: 2016

The Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies, 2016, rates 104 jurisdictions around the world based on a combination of their geologic attractiveness for minerals and metals and their policy attractiveness. This year, Saskatchewan ranks as the top jurisdiction in the world, followed by Manitoba.

— Feb 28, 2017
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Permit Times for Mining Exploration in 2016

Permit Times for Mining Exploration in 2016 finds that Canadian jurisdictions are competitive globally when it comes to approving exploratory mining permits, but some provinces are falling behind, and jurisdictions in the U.S., Australia and Scandinavia are more transparent and offer more certainty to miners in the permitting process.

— Feb 16, 2017
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Examining the Revenue Neutrality of British Columbia's Carbon Tax

Examining the Revenue Neutrality of British Columbia’s Carbon Tax finds that the tax is no longer revenue neutral, and could actually result in almost $900 million in higher taxes over a six-year period. These findings are especially important given the federal government’s requirement on the provinces to adopt a carbon pricing system by 2018, and the fact that proponents often tout B.C.’s carbon tax as a model to follow, in part because of its alleged revenue neutrality.