Taylor Jackson

Independent Researcher

Taylor Jackson is an Independent Researcher and a former Senior Policy Analyst with the Fraser Institute. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from Simon Fraser University. Mr. Jackson is the coauthor of a number of Fraser Institute studies, including Safety in the Transportation of Oil and Gas: Pipelines or Rail?, and the Fraser Institute's annual Global Petroleum Survey, and Survey of Mining Companies. He is also the coauthor of a book chapter on the past, present, and future of Canadian-American relations with Professor Alexander Moens. Mr Jackson's work has been covered in the media all around the world and his commentaries have appeared in the National Post, Financial Post, and Washington Times, as well as other newspapers across Canada.

Recent Research by Taylor Jackson

— Sep 6, 2018
Printer-friendly version
The Impact of Proportional Representation on British Columbia’s Legislature and Voters

The Impact of Proportional Representation on British Columbia’s Legislature and Voters finds that changing British Columbia’s voting system to a form of proportional representation would give rise to smaller, single-issue parties, lead to more coalition governments and increase uncertainty in Victoria, based on an analysis of election data from 30 countries between 2000 and 2017.

— Aug 2, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Financial Markets, Laws, and Entrepreneurship

Financial Markets, Laws, and Entrepreneurship and Spurring Entrepreneurship through Capital Gains Tax Reform—chapters in a recent book on demographics and entrepreneurship—find that eliminating, or at least lowering, Canada’s uncompetitive tax rate on capital gains is the best policy for encouraging entrepreneurial financing, which is critical for new business startups.

— May 3, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment

Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment finds that by increasing the Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, the federal and provincial governments will inadvertently shrink the pool of money available for investments in Canada—potentially up to $114 billion by 2030.