Taylor Jackson

Independent Researcher

Taylor Jackson is an Independent Researcher and a former Senior Policy Analyst with the Fraser Institute. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from Simon Fraser University. Mr. Jackson is the coauthor of a number of Fraser Institute studies, including Safety in the Transportation of Oil and Gas: Pipelines or Rail?, and the Fraser Institute's annual Global Petroleum Survey, and Survey of Mining Companies. He is also the coauthor of a book chapter on the past, present, and future of Canadian-American relations with Professor Alexander Moens. Mr Jackson's work has been covered in the media all around the world and his commentaries have appeared in the National Post, Financial Post, and Washington Times, as well as other newspapers across Canada.

Recent Research by Taylor Jackson

— Nov 30, 2017
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Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada

Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada is a new book that finds the problem of inequality isn’t nearly as bad in Canada as people are sometimes led to believe. Canadians are more able, thanks to opportunities of mobility, to get out of a low-income situation, middle-class incomes are not stagnating and most people can and do build-up wealth over the course of their lives.

— Nov 21, 2017
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Bending the Curve: Recent Developments in Government Spending on First Nations

Bending the Curve: Recent Developments in Government Spending on First Nations finds that First Nations across Canada are generating billions in revenue for themselves—and not only from natural resources. According to the study, the average own-source revenue total for approximately 80 per cent of all First Nations in Canada (those with publicly available data) was $5.9 million in 2015/16.

— Oct 31, 2017
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Canada’s Aging Population and Implications for Government Finances

Canada’s Aging Population and Implications for Government Finances finds that the aging population will put significant stress on government spending programs and could increase deficits for federal and provincial governments to an estimated $143 billion by 2045—three and a half times larger than total federal and provincial government deficits in 2017.