Alex Whalen

Policy Analyst

Alex Whalen is a Policy Analyst with the Fraser Institute and coordinator of the activities of the Atlantic Canada division. Prior to joining the Institute, Alex was Vice-President of the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies (AIMS), which merged with the Fraser Institute in 2019. He is a graduate of the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University, and the School of Business at the University of Prince Edward Island. He brings prior experience as an entrepreneur and business manager to his work at the Institute. His writing has appeared widely in newspapers including the Globe and Mail, National Post, Chronicle Herald, Telegraph Journal, Calgary Herald, and others.

Recent Research by Alex Whalen

— Jun 30, 2022
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The State of Markets in Atlantic Canada

The State of Markets in Atlantic Canada is a new study that finds private markets in the Maritimes generally underperformed those in the rest of Canada, with Nova Scotia ranking last among all provinces for private sector investment in 2019 (the most recent year of available data prior to the COVID-19 pandemic), and New Brunswick ranking 8th.

— Mar 24, 2022
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High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec

High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec is a new study that finds Atlantic Canada and Quebec have some of the highest personal income tax rates nationwide on individuals and households that earn $100,000 or more a year, but also have the lowest percentages of tax filers with over $100,000 of income. By comparison, Ontario and western Canadian provinces have lower tax rates on high-income earners, and also a higher share of tax filers that earn more than $100,000 annually.

— Mar 17, 2022
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The Size of Government in Canada in 2019

The Size of Government in Canada in 2019 is a new study that finds the size of government across Canada was on the rise even before the COVID-19 pandemic and recession. In fact, relative to the size of the provincial economies, the size of government increased in all but two provinces over the 2007 to 2019 period.