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Measuring Personal Income Tax Complexity in Canada

Measuring Personal Income Tax Complexity in Canada, examines the evolution of Canadian tax legislation, tax guides and tax expenditures in an effort to quantify complexity. For example, the study finds that between between 1981 and 2014, the number of federal personal income tax expenditures (i.e. targeted tax breaks for particular individuals or activities including deductions, exemptions, exclusions, and tax credits) available to Canadians increased from 101 to 128—an increase of 27 per cent.

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Learning from the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative to Improve Wait Times in Canada

In 2010, the Saskatchewan government launched the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative (SSI) – a program to tackle long wait times for medically necessary surgeries and which included the controversial introduction of private for-profit clinics. The study, Learning from the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative to Improve Wait Times in Canada, cites Government of Saskatchewan statistics from 2014 showing a 75 per cent decline in the number of patients waiting for more than 3 months for medical treatment.

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Measuring Income Mobility in Canada, 2016 finds that Canada has high levels of income mobility -- the ability of individuals to move up the income ladder. For example, within a 10 year period (1993 to 2012), nine of every 10 Canadians in the lowest income group moved to a higher income group.

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Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2016

The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2016 finds that long waits for surgery and medical treatment cost Canadians almost $1.2 billion—or $1,304 per patient—in lost income and productivity.

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Comparing Recent Economic Performance in Canada and the United States

The resilience of the Canadian economy during the global recession, and its strong performance post-recession, was largely rooted in the resource-intensive provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, and British Columbia. Now, with the fall in commodity prices and the ensuing economic slowdown in those provinces, Comparing Recent Economic Performance in Canada and the United States: A Provincial and State-Level Analysis, outlines the weaknesses of provinces east of Manitoba—including Ontario—and the pro-growth policies necessary for governments across Canada.

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Demand-Side Mismanagement: How Conservation Became Waste

Demand-Side Mismanagement: How Conservation Became Waste examines energy conservation programs in Ontario such as smart metering, home retrofit rebates for insulation, caulking, etc., and subsidies for consumers who purchase energy-efficient appliances. It finds that Ontario taxpayers and ratepayers have doled out billions of dollars in energy conservation subsidies over the decades with no verifiable evidence that conservation programs actually save consumers money.

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Report Card on British Columbia's Elementary Schools 2016

Report Card on British Columbia’s Elementary Schools 2016 ranks 944 public and independent elementary schools based on 10 academic indicators derived from the annual Foundation Skills Assessments (FSAs) administered for the B.C. Ministry of Education. The report card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else: In addition to five years of academic results, the report card shows which schools are improving or falling  behind.