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Deferring Federal Taxes: Illustrating the Deficit Using the GST

Deferring Federal Taxes: Illustrating the Deficit Using the GST is a new study that uses the goods and services tax to highlight how much tax the federal government was deferring before the recession. To contextualize the size of the pre-recession deficit, the federal GST (currently five per cent) would have to have been nine per cent in order to balance the budget.

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Report Card on Ontario's Secondary Schools 2020

Report Card on Ontario’s Secondary Schools, 2020 ranks 739 anglophone and francophone public and Catholic secondary schools (and a small number of independent and First Nations schools) on nine academic indicators derived from annual provincewide reading, writing and math tests. The Report Card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else. In addition to five years of academic results, the Report Card also shows which schools are improving or falling behind.

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May 19, 2020 is Tax Freedom Day, which represents the total yearly tax burden imposed on Canadian families: If you had to pay all your taxes up front, you’d give government every dollar you earned before May 19. This year, the average Canadian family will pay 37.7 per cent of its income in taxes. Ordinarily Tax Freedom Day comes much later in the year—last year it fell on June 8th—but, an earlier Tax Freedom Day this year is nothing to celebrate, since it’s not the result of governments reducing taxes. Instead, Canadian families have been significantly impacted by the economic shutdowns in response to COVID-19. When the economy slows and incomes decline, Canadians are bumped into lower income tax brackets and pay a smaller percentage of income in taxes. Canadians have also reduced their spending, which means less sales taxes are being paid.

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The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2020

The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2020 is a new study that finds long waits for surgery and medical treatment cost Canadians almost $2.1 billion in lost wages and productivity last year-costs that could increase now that many provinces have postponed elective (or scheduled) surgeries as a result of COVID-19. Crucially, more than one million Canadian (1,064,286) patients waited for medically necessary treatment last year, and each lost an estimated $1,963 (on average) due to lost wages and reduced productivity during working hours.

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A Friend in Need: How Albertans Continue to Keep Federal Finances Afloat, 2020

A Friend in Need: How Albertans Continue to Keep Federal Finances Afloat, 2020 finds that from 2014 to 2018, Alberta’s net contribution to federal finances was $94.9 billion, by far the largest contribution from any province during that time period. Crucially, Ontario’s net contribution was $58.3 billion, but it’s population in 2018 was more than three times larger than Alberta’s. British Columbia was the only other net contributing province ($29.6 billion) during that time, meaning every other province received more from Ottawa than it sent to Ottawa.

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Environmental Ranking for Canada and the OECD, 2nd Edition ranks 33 comparable high-income countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development on a wide range of environmental indicators that relate both to the protection of human health, such as air pollution, and the preservation of Canada’s ecosystems, such as water quality. It finds that Canada’s environmental record outperforms the majority of OECD countries, despite the fact that Canada is much larger and colder by comparison, and has a large natural resources industry.