Printer-friendly version
global go-to think tank report 2016

The Fraser Institute is once again the top think tank in Canada and ranks in the top 20 among all think tanks worldwide, according to the 2016 Global Go To Think Tank Index published by the University of Pennsylvania. The Fraser Institute ranks 11th best worldwide among independent think tanks, which the report defines as having independence from any one interest group or donor and autonomous in its operation and funding from government.

Printer-friendly version
Alberta's Budget Deficit: Why Spending is to Blame, 2017

Alberta’s Budget Deficit: Why Spending Is To Blame, 2017 finds that the Alberta government could have posted a small budget surplus this year instead of a $10.8 billion deficit if successive governments had kept program spending increases in line with population growth and inflation.

Printer-friendly version
Intellectual Property Rights Protection and the Biopharmaceutical Industry: How Canada Measures Up

Intellectual Property Rights Protection and the Biopharmaceutical Industry: How Canada Measures Up finds that Canada’s inadequate patent protections for pharmaceuticals are hampering innovation and economic growth. In fact, between 2001 and 2015, biopharmaceutical research and development spending in Canada declined by 20 per cent.

Printer-friendly version
Cost of Government Debt in Canada, 2017

The Cost of Government Debt in Canada, 2017 finds that paying the interest on all government debt in Canada cost taxpayers $62.8 billion last year, which translates into $1,752 for every Canadian or slightly more than $7,000 for a family of four. In fact, interest payments on just the federal debt—$24.9 billion—is roughly the same as the federal government’s projected deficit this year—$25.1 billion.

Printer-friendly version
Did the Coal Phase-out Reduce Ontario Air Pollution?

Did the Coal Phase-out Reduce Ontario Air Pollution finds that the coal phase-out produced only a small reduction in fine particulates, a common measure of air pollution, and in Toronto and Hamilton, the reduction was statistically insignificant. In fact, had the province completed its modernization of the coal-fired plants, instead of shutting them down, fine particulate reductions of the same size could have been achieved at a much lower cost.

Printer-friendly version
Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia finds that government workers in B.C. receive 7.4 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector, and enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits, too. For example, nine-in-ten public sector workers have defined benefit pension plans, compared to just one-in-ten in the private sector. And government workers retire, on average, 2.5 years earlier.

Printer-friendly version
Regulation and Funding of Independent Schools: Lessons from Australia

Regulation and Funding of Independent Schools: Lessons from Australia examines that country’s education system and highlights its unique funding model for non-government (independent and religious) schools. In Australia, government funding of independent schools varies between 20 and 90 per cent per student (for operating expenses) depending on the average income of the neighbourhood in which the student lives, making them more affordable for lower-income families.