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Atlantic Canada Prosperity

— Dec 15, 2020
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Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2020 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2020 Generosity Index finds that the total amount donated to registered charities by Canadians in 2018—just 0.54 per cent of their income—is the second lowest amount since at least 2000. By comparison, American tax-filers donated 1.97 per cent of their income to registered charities in 2018—nearly four times the percentage Canadians claimed.

— Dec 10, 2020
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Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2020 Report

Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2020 is a new study that finds Canada’s health-care wait times reached 22.6 weeks in 2020—the longest ever recorded—and 143 per cent higher than the 9.3 weeks Canadians waited in 1993, when the Fraser Institute began tracking medical wait times. Before this year, the longest recorded wait time was 21.2 weeks in 2017. Atlantic Canada has the longest wait times in the country this year, and Ontario recorded the shortest wait time, which was still more than four months long.

— Dec 3, 2020
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The Great Convergence: Measuring the Fiscal Gap Between “Have” and “Have-Not” Provinces

The Great Convergence: Measuring the Fiscal Capacity Gap Between “Have” and “Have-Not” Provinces is a new study that finds the gap between the ability of Canada’s richer and poorer provinces to raise revenues is shrinking rapidly. If Alberta’s fiscal capacity gap continues to shrink relative to the rest of Canada, the province could soon become eligible for equalization transfers, which would affect transfers to other so-called “have not” provinces.

— Sep 15, 2020
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The Changing Size of Government in Canada, 2007–2018

The Changing Size of Government in Canada is a new study that finds the combined size of the federal, provincial and municipal governments increased in every province, relative to the size of their economies, except Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island over the past 10 years.

— Aug 25, 2020
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Measuring the Equalization Clawback on Natural Resource Revenue in Have-Not Provinces

Measuring the Equalization Clawback on Natural Resource Revenue in Have-Not Provinces finds that Canada’s equalization program discourages natural resource development in “have-not” provinces, including all three Maritime provinces. As a province receives more revenue from natural resource developments, it receives less money from the federal government in equalization transfers, and consequently, governments in have-not provinces that receive equalization are discouraged by the clawbacks from developing natural resources.

— Jul 28, 2020
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Capital Investment in Canada’s Provinces: A Provincial Report

Capital Investment in Canada's Provinces: A Provincial Report measures growth in investment at the provincial level from 1990 to 2014 and from 2014 to 2018, the most recent year of comparable data. It finds that many of the provinces that historically enjoyed strong levels of investment—such as Alberta and Saskatchewan—have seen investment stall as a result of low oil prices. While British Columbia and Ontario remain strong performers, largely as a result of strong housing and finance sectors, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have consistently lagged the national average over the 30-year period. Newfoundland and Labrador has enjoyed some of the highest investment growth in the country because of large hydroelectric projects currently underway in the province.

— Jun 23, 2020
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Extended Employment Insurance Now Open to All: Atlantic Canada’s Warning for Other Provinces

Extended Employment Insurance Now Open to All: Atlantic Canada’s Warning for Other Provinces finds that as unemployment rates increase and Canada’s employment insurance (EI) program automatically becomes more generous and accessible, many more people are now qualifying for much more generous benefits. This will add to Ottawa’s financial pressures and also risks increasing long-term unemployment, as was experienced in Atlantic Canada.

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