Government Spending & Taxes

— May 12, 2022
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What Changed in Alberta from the Fall 2021 Mid-year Update to Budget 2022

What Changed in Alberta from the Fall 2021 Mid-year Update to Budget 2022 is a new study that finds following a windfall in resource revenue, the recent Alberta budget increased program spending by $4 billion over the next three years. This increase in spending is above and beyond what would be required to keep pace with inflation and population growth.

— May 3, 2022
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Polling Canadians’ Support for New Federal Government Programs

Polling Canadians’ Support for New Federal Government Programs is a new study, based on a Leger poll commissioned by the Fraser Institute, that finds support for national dental care, pharmacare and $10-a-day daycare drops significantly when tax increases are included, specifically GST hikes. In fact, 4-in-10 Canadians (or less) support the new programs introduced or committed to in the recent federal budget if the GST were increased in order to pay for them.

— Apr 26, 2022
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What Are the Economic Costs of Raising Revenue by the Canadian Federal Government?

What Are the Economic Costs of Raising Revenue by the Canadian Federal Government? finds that for every additional ($1) dollar of personal income tax revenue collected by the federal government, $2.86 is lost in economic activity because of less investment, less entrepreneurship, less spending and other behavioural changes that shrink the tax base.

— Apr 6, 2022
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No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners

No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners finds that if the federal government, which plans to table its next budget this week, wants to fund a major expansion of government, it simply can’t raise enough tax revenue solely from Canada’s upper-income families.

— Mar 31, 2022
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Learning from Ontario’s Past

Learning from Ontario’s Past: How Ontario Can Avoid Another Post-Recession Debt Binge is a new study that focuses on how the provincial government could balance the budget by 2022/23, and what mistakes made by past governments should be avoided to ensure fiscal stability. Based on recent projections, the provincial government would need to reduce annual spending by $9.1 billion from its 2021/22 level to balance the budget in 2022/23—a 4.8 per cent decrease.

— Mar 24, 2022
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High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec

High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec is a new study that finds Atlantic Canada and Quebec have some of the highest personal income tax rates nationwide on individuals and households that earn $100,000 or more a year, but also have the lowest percentages of tax filers with over $100,000 of income. By comparison, Ontario and western Canadian provinces have lower tax rates on high-income earners, and also a higher share of tax filers that earn more than $100,000 annually.

— Mar 17, 2022
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The Size of Government in Canada in 2019

The Size of Government in Canada in 2019 is a new study that finds the size of government across Canada was on the rise even before the COVID-19 pandemic and recession. In fact, relative to the size of the provincial economies, the size of government increased in all but two provinces over the 2007 to 2019 period.

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