Government Spending & Taxes

— Aug 27, 2020
Printer-friendly version
Federal Government Wasting Billions on Poorly Targeted Assistance

Federal Government Wasting Billions on Poorly Targeted Assistance is a new study that finds the federal government is potentially wasting more than $22 billion in COVID recession spending because the money is not being adequately targeted to those in need. Crucially, more than one-in-four dollars (27.4 per cent) of the COVID-related spending included in the analysis is potentially going to Canadians with questionable need at a time when Ottawa is running a historic deficit.

— Aug 13, 2020
Printer-friendly version
The Issues Facing Canada's Employment Insurance Program

The Issues Facing Canada’s Employment Insurance Program is a new study that finds the current design of Canada’s employment insurance program creates regional disparities, distorts labour markets, provides inadequate coverage for part-time workers and the self-employed, and will impose a financial burden on Canadians.

— Aug 6, 2020
Printer-friendly version
Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax?

Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax? Finds that B.C.’s new “health tax,” which essentially replaced the province’s Medical Services Plan (MSP), will cost the average worker nearly $3,000 per year in foregone wages.

— Jul 16, 2020
Printer-friendly version
Distribution of CERB: Estimating the Number of Eligible Young People Living with Parents

Distribution of CERB: Estimating the Number of Young People Eligible and Living with Parents finds that young people living at home with their parents in households with at least $100,000 of income are eligible for as much as $11.8 billion in Canadian Emergency Relief Benefit (CERB) payments. Crucially, many of these young, dependent Canadians could actually see a significant increase in their monthly income by receiving CERB payments.

— Jul 14, 2020
Printer-friendly version
The Revenue Effects of Rescinding Ontario's Tax Rate Hike on High-Income Earners

The Revenue Effects of Rescinding Ontario’s Tax Rate Hike on High-income Earners finds that lowering the province’s top personal income tax rate from the current 20.53 per cent back to 17.41 per cent—where it was prior to a so-called “temporary” rate hike in 2012—would only cost the government $26 million in the first year in foregone tax revenues, thanks to increased economic activity. And lowering the province’s top personal income tax rate would significantly increase Ontario’s attractiveness for investment, entrepreneurs and high-skilled workers.

— Jul 7, 2020
Printer-friendly version
Canada’s Rising Personal Tax Rates and Falling Tax Competitiveness, 2020

Canada’s Rising Personal Tax Rates and Falling Tax Competitiveness, 2020 finds that workers in Canada—across all income levels—pay higher personal income tax rates than workers in the United States, which can deter professionals, entrepreneurs and businessowners from working and investing in Canada.

— Jun 30, 2020
Printer-friendly version
Explaining the Growth in Federal Program Spending since 2015

Explaining the Growth in Federal Program Spending since 2015 finds that of the 34 federal government departments, programs and agencies, just five—covering Indigenous affairs, child benefits, seniors’ benefits, the Canada Health Transfer and defence—account for nearly two-thirds of the total increase in spending over the past five years.

Subscribe to the Fraser Institute

Get the latest news from the Fraser Institute on the latest research studies, news and events.

Research Experts