Government Spending & Taxes

— Feb 17, 2021
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Atlantic Canada's Precarious Public Finances

Atlantic Canada’s Precarious Public Finances finds that the financial positions of the four Atlantic provinces are unsustainable, and they will face rising debt-to-GDP ratios in the coming years in the absence of policy changes or improved economic growth. Crucially, the Atlantic provinces’ finances are more vulnerable than those in other provinces because of a number of economic and demographic factors in the region, such as an older population, high tax and interest rates, and a greater dependency on federal transfers from Ottawa.

— Feb 11, 2021
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Comparing Economic Performance in Five Pre-Recession Periods is a new study that compares numerous economic indicators relating to income growth, labour markets and business investment for the last five pre-recessionary periods: 1986-1989, 1997-2000, 2005-2008, 2011-2014, and 2016-2019. On almost all of the measures included in the analysis, the economic performance from 2016 to 2019 (the years preceding the COVID-19 recession) was the weakest.

— Feb 2, 2021
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The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians: 2021 Edition

The Growing Debt Burden for Canadians: 2021 Edition is a new study that finds combined federal and provincial government debt in Canada has doubled from $1.0 trillion in 2007/08 to a projected $2.0 trillion this year. And the combined debt now equals 91.6 per cent of the Canadian economy—up from 65.2 per cent last year.

— Jan 28, 2021
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Fiscal Federalism and the Dependency of Atlantic Canada

Fiscal Federalism and the Dependency of Atlantic Canada is a new study that examines Atlantic Canada’s dependency on fiscal transfers from Ottawa, and highlights how the region is vulnerable to any significant changes in fiscal federalism. The study finds that from 2007 to 2019, federal spending (including Employment Insurance, equalization, health care, and various other subsidies and programs) in Atlantic Canada equaled more than a quarter—27.5 per cent—of the region’s economy

— Jan 26, 2021
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Promise and Performance: Recent Trends in Government Expenditures on Indigenous Peoples

Promise and Performance: Recent Trends in Government Expenditures on Indigenous Peoples finds that, according to federal budget projections, from fiscal year 2015-16 to 2021-22, federal spending on Indigenous programs will increase by 50 per cent—from $11 billion to more than $17 billion—despite evidence that more money won’t solve the chronic problems in First Nations communities.

— Jan 19, 2021
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Correcting Common Misunderstandings about Capital Gains Taxes is a new study that finds Canadians earning less than $100,000 a year pay a much greater portion of capital gains taxes than many believe. In fact, the estimated share of capital gains taxes paid by those earning less than $100,000 a year is 38.4 per cent when the capital gain is excluded from income.

— Jan 5, 2021
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Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2021 Edition

Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2021 Edition finds that the spending in Canadian public schools is up 13 per cent, or $8.2 billion in nominal spending, since 2013/2014. After adjusting for inflation and changes in enrolment over the same five-year period, per-student spending on public schools increased in eight out of 10 provinces in Canada.

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