Government Spending & Taxes

— Nov 23, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in British Columbia

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in British Columbia is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 4.2 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of British Columbia’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040 unless it makes changes to its spending.

— Nov 18, 2021
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Tax and Expenditure Limitations for Canada’s Federal Government: A Primer

Tax and Expenditure Limitations for Canada’s Federal Government: A Primer is a new study that finds if the federal government had introduced more discipline on the growth in government spending beginning in 2015—even one that allowed for all the COVID emergency spending—the federal budget could have been balanced by 2025/26. Instead, the Parliamentary Budget Officer predicts it will be at least 2070 before the budget is balanced.

— Nov 9, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Ontario

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Ontario is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 4.1 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of Ontario’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040/41 unless it makes changes to its spending.

— Nov 4, 2021
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Why Is Equalization Still Growing? 2021 Update

Why Is Equalization Still Growing? 2021 Update is a new study that predicts how, due to a design flaw in Canada’s equalization program, “have not” provinces will receive $8.9 billion in overpayments by 2025/26. This design flaw means billions in additional equalization spending in the years ahead, despite the shrinking gap between richer and poorer provinces.

— Oct 26, 2021
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Fiscal Explosion: Federal Spending on Indigenous  Programs, 2015–2022

Fiscal Explosion: Federal Spending on Indigenous Programs, 2015-2022 finds that since 2015 federal spending on Indigenous programs has skyrocketed from $12.4 billion to $24 billion—or by 94.3 per cent.

— Oct 19, 2021
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Less Ottawa, More Province, 2021

Less Ottawa, More Province, 2021: How Decentralized Federalism is Key to Health Care Reform is a new study that examines two of the most important ongoing public policy challenges facing Canada: the deterioration of government finances, and the comparative underperformance of our health care system. Fundamental reform of Canada’s health care system can be achieved by replicating changes made by the Chretien government in the 1990s when Ottawa removed strings to federal funding for welfare, providing the provinces with more autonomy and flexibility.

— Oct 14, 2021
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Prime Ministers and Government Spending: Updated 2021 Edition

Prime Ministers and Government Spending, Updated 2021 Edition is a new study that analyzes program spending by prime minister since Confederation, and finds that in 2020/21, federal program spending is expected to reach a minimum of $13,032 (inflation adjusted), which is 34.8 per cent higher than in 2019, pre-COVID, and 42.4 per cent higher than the level of spending recorded during 2009, a pronounced global recession.

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