Government Spending & Taxes

— Aug 24, 2017
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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2017 finds that last year the average Canadian family paid twice as much of their income in taxes (42.5 per cent) as they did for housing (22.1 per cent). The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2016, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

— Aug 22, 2017
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Should Equalization Keep On Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity

Should Equalization Keep on Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity? finds that, as traditional “have” provinces struggle economically, Canada’s equalization program is not equipped to adapt to the country’s new economic landscape. In fact, a rule introduced to cap equalization increases to ensure program affordability could actually add as much as $2.7 billion to program costs over the next two years.

— Aug 10, 2017
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Rae Days in Alberta: The Notley Government at Two Years

Rae Days in Alberta: The Notley Government at Two Years finds that Alberta’s NDP government under Premier Rachel Notley is following the failed policies of Bob Rae’s NDP government in Ontario in the 1990s rather than the successful NDP government of Roy Romanow in Saskatchewan.

— Aug 3, 2017
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Wishful Thinking: An Analysis of Ontario’s Timeline for Shrinking Its Debt Burden

Wishful Thinking: An Analysis of Ontario’s Timeline for Shrinking Its Debt Burden finds that Queen’s Park’s timeline for reducing the province’s historically high debt burden relies on optimistic and questionable assumptions and lacks a detailed, credible plan to achieve it.

— Jul 18, 2017
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Household Debt and Government Debt in Canada

Household Debt and Government Debt in Canada finds that, although household debt in Canada increased to more than $2 trillion in 2016—up from $357 billion in 1990—Canadian household assets (real estate, pensions, financial investments and equity in businesses, for example) also increased in value over the same time period to $12.3 trillion last year. But whereas recent increases in Canadian household debt have been accompanied by increases in net worth, the same cannot be said about government debt.

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