Government Spending & Taxes

— Dec 1, 2020
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An Evaluation of the Recent Performance of British Columbia’s Economy

An Evaluation of the Recent Performance of British Columbia’s Economy finds that any downturn in B.C.'s housing sector will have serious consequences for the provincial economy.

— Nov 26, 2020
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The Distribution of the Canada Child Benefit by Family Type and Income Level

The Distribution of the Canada Child Benefit by Family Type and Income Level, part three of an essay series on the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), finds that families with between $100,000 and $120,000 of annual household income received (on average) roughly the same increase in cash benefits from the new CCB program than families with less than $20,000 of income.

— Oct 27, 2020
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Financing the Canada Child Benefit

Financing the Canada Child Benefit, part two of an essay series on the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), finds that federal spending on benefits for eligible families with children through the CCB increased by 68.5 per cent from fiscal year 2014/15 to 2019/20—financed entirely by borrowing.

— Oct 15, 2020
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Does Canada Need a Wealth Tax?

Does Canada Need a Wealth Tax? is a new study that finds not only will implementing a wealth tax reduce Canada’s economic growth and recovery post-COVID, but that it is unnecessary as the wealth inequality gap is shrinking in Canada. A wealth tax in Canada would constrain economic growth by discouraging savings and investment, especially when wealth taxes are layered on top of existing taxes.

— Oct 6, 2020
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Is the Canada Child Benefit Targeted to those Most in Need?

Is the Canada Child Benefit Targeted to those Most in Need?, part one of an essay series on the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), finds that families with less than $40,000 of annual household income receive 16.2 per cent of total benefits from the CCB program—compared to 21.8 per cent under two child benefit programs scrapped by the federal government in 2016.

— Oct 1, 2020
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Local Leviathans: The Rise of Municipal Government Spending in Canada, 1990–2018

Local Leviathans: The Rise of Municipal Government Spending in Canada, 1990–2018 finds that local governments across Canada have increased spending significantly in recent years—even before the COVID-19 pandemic and recession. In fact, from 2008 to 2018, total municipal spending in Canada increased 51 per cent, from $68.4 billion to $103.3 billion. And total municipal government revenues—including taxes, user fees and grants from other levels of government—increased 54 per cent over the same recent 10-year period.

— Sep 22, 2020
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Canada’s Aging Population and Long-Term Projections for Federal Finances

Canada's Aging Population and Long-Term Projections for Federal Finances finds that the federal government is not on track to balance the budget anytime over the next 30 years as a result of Canada’s aging population and Ottawa’s historically high spending pre-COVID.

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