Health Care

— Dec 13, 2018
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The Unintended Consequences of National Pharmacare Programs: The Experiences of Australia, New Zealand, and the UK

The Unintended Consequences of National Pharmacare Programs in Australia, New Zealand and the UK finds that publicly-funded pharmacare schemes—similar to what some policymakers in Canada are considering—in other developed countries have resulted in reduced access to new drugs for patients, drug shortages, higher taxes and less pharmaceutical innovation.

— Dec 4, 2018
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Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2018 Report

Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2018 finds that the median wait time for medically necessary treatment in Canada this year was 19.8 weeks. Among the provinces, Saskatchewan has the shortest median wait time this year at 15.4 weeks, and New Brunswick again recorded the longest wait time (45.1 weeks).

— Nov 8, 2018
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Comparing Performance of Universal Health Care Countries, 2018 finds that Canada spends more on health care than a majority of 28 comparable countries with universal coverage, but ranks near the bottom in terms of the number of physicians and hospital beds, and Canada suffers from the longest wait times.

— Oct 16, 2018
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Provincial Drug Coverage for Vulnerable Canadians

Provincial Drug Coverage for Vulnerable Canadians finds that every province already provides prescription drug coverage to help Canadians—particularly seniors and lower-income Canadians—pay for pharmaceuticals. Crucially, provinces are able to establish prescription drug plans to suit their particular priorities, population age, income levels and other factors, which differ from province to province. This customization would likely be lost or at least diluted if Canada adopts a national pharmacare program.

— Aug 28, 2018
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Regulatory, Reimbursement, and Pricing Barriers to Accessing Drugs for Rare Disorders in Canada

Regulatory, Reimbursement and Pricing Barriers to Accessing Drugs for Rare Disorders in Canada finds that the federal government’s plan to increasingly regulate the costs of pharmaceuticals could mean Canadians suffering from cystic fibrosis and other rare diseases may soon lose access to new innovative drug treatments, even though these patients are already denied new drugs available elsewhere.

— Jul 31, 2018
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The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2018

The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2018 finds that a typical Canadian family of four will pay $12,935 for health care in 2018. After adjusting for inflation, that’s an increase of 68.5 per cent since 1997, the first year estimates could be calculated. For single Canadians, health-care costs have more than doubled over that same time period—from $2,115 (in 2018 dollars) to $4,640 this year.

— Jul 20, 2018
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Implications of the proposed changes to Canada's pharmaceutical pricing regulations

Implications of the Proposed Changes to Canada’s Pharmaceutical Pricing Regulations finds that the federal government’s plan to lower the cost of patented pharmaceuticals in Canada through new regulations seriously risks limiting patient access to new innovative drugs. The is the first study in a series on pharmaceutical drug pricing policy reforms.

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