Provincial Economic Freedom in Canada 1981-1998

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In its simplest form, economic freedom involves the freedom to make choices, freedom of exchange, and protection of private property. Any major impediment to the exercise of these rights as a result of intervention by government is a violation of economic freedom. The freest of economies will operate with a minimal amount of government interference, relying upon personal choice and markets.

Economic freedom is vital to the well-being of all Canadians. Those provinces that liberate their economies receive dividends for their efforts in the form of higher rates of growth and higher levels of income per capita. When provincial governments restrict economic freedom, growth is dampened and income per capita declines relative to economically free jurisdictions.

In its simplest form, economic freedom involves the freedom to make choices, freedom of exchange, and protection of private property. Any major impediment to the exercise of these rights as a result of intervention by government is a violation of economic freedom. The freest of economies will operate with a minimal amount of government interference, relying upon personal choice and markets to answer basic economic questions such as what is to be produced, how much is to be produced, and for whom production is intended.


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