Provincial Prosperity

— Jun 14, 2017
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Impact of Proposed NDP-Green Tax Changes on BC Families

The Impact of Proposed NDP-Green Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average B.C. family’s tax bill would increase by $594 under an NDP-Green government, led mainly by a $482 increase in fuel and carbon taxes.

— May 30, 2017
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Race to the Bottom: Comparing the Recent Deficits of Alberta and Ontario finds that the Alberta government’s current string of budget deficits are 65 per cent larger, on a per person basis, than Ontario’s deficits following the 2009 recession, and Alberta—which was debt free until quite recently—is also catching up to Ontario’s per person debt levels.

— May 13, 2017
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Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2017

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2017 ranks 293 public and independent secondary schools based on seven academic indicators using student results from annual provincewide exams, grade-to-grade transition rates, and graduation rates.

— Apr 27, 2017
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New Homes and Red Tape in British Columbia 2017

New Homes and Red Tape in British Columbia: Residential Land-Use Regulation in the Lower Mainland finds that The City of Vancouver is the most heavily regulated municipality in the Lower Mainland for residential development and is stifling new homebuilding. The survey of homebuilders ranks 19 of the region’s municipalities when it comes to residential development regulations.

— Apr 1, 2017
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Report Card on Alberta’s Elementary Schools 2017

Report Card on Alberta’s Elementary Schools 2017 ranks 790 public, separate, francophone, independent, and charter schools based on seven academic indicators derived from provincewide test results. In addition to five years of academic results, the report card shows which Alberta elementary schools have improved, or fallen behind, in terms of language, math, science and social studies over the past five years.

— Mar 30, 2017
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Hold the Celebration

Hold the Celebration: A Balanced Budget Won’t End Ontario’s Fiscal Challenges finds that Ontario’s debt is expected to continue to grow—increasing by approximately $9 billion next year—despite the government’s promise to finally balance its budget next month. Currently, Ontario’s debt relative to the size of the provincial economy stands at approximately 40 per cent and is expected to hover close to this historically high level for the foreseeable future.

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