Provincial Prosperity

— Nov 17, 2018
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Report Card on Quebec's Secondary Schools 2018

The Report Card on Quebec’s Secondary Schools 2018 ranks 452 public, private, Francophone and Anglophone schools based largely on the results from provincewide tests in French, English, science, mathematics and history. The Report Card provides parents and educators with objective information that’s difficult to find anywhere else, which is why it’s the go-to source for school performance in Quebec.

— Nov 15, 2018
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Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High

Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High finds that drivers in British Columbia pay higher rates, in part, because ICBC doesn’t fully account for age when setting rates, so older, safer drivers pay more to subsidize younger, riskier drivers, who pay less than they otherwise would. Also, ICBC uses driver premiums to pay for non-insurance related costs—such as driver testing, driver and vehicle licensing and fine collection—which also drive up costs.

— Oct 24, 2018
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario finds that public-sector employees in Ontario—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 10.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

— Oct 23, 2018
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Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta

Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta finds that the province’s investment attractiveness has diminished in the eyes of oil, gas and mining executives, primarily due to the province’s increasing regulatory burden. Specifically, environmental regulations and the cost of complying with Alberta’s red tape are increasingly cited as reasons not to invest in the province.

— Oct 18, 2018
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The Consequences of Electoral Reform in British Columbia

The Consequences of Electoral Reform in British Columbia finds that changing the province’s voting system to a form of proportional representation, or PR, would lead to bigger costlier provincial governments. In fact, governments elected under PR systems are nearly 30 per cent bigger than governments elected under first-past-the-post, based on election data from 26 countries between 2004 and 2015 (the most recent year of comparable data).

— Oct 4, 2018
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Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down

Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down finds that the Ontario government could reduce current electricity prices for Ontarians by 24 per cent by either cancelling or renegotiating existing contracts with wind and solar-power generators. These contracts represent almost 40 per cent of the Global Adjustment charge on Ontarians’ hydro bills while providing just seven per cent of the province’s total electricity generation.