Provincial Prosperity

— Sep 19, 2018
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Creating Policy Calling Cards to Attract Business to Ontario finds that major reforms in different policy areas are required to make the province “open for business,” as the new government has pledged. Suggested reforms include: cutting corporate and personal income taxes, reducing business subsidies, lowering electricity costs and reforming the province’s labour laws.

— Sep 19, 2018
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Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families

Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average family in British Columbia—with a 2018 household income of $114,809—will pay $969 more a year in taxes due to the B.C. government’s recent tax changes. Crucially, that figure does not include several residential property tax increases, such as the increased property transfer taxes, the foreign buyers tax, the speculation tax and the school tax.

— Aug 30, 2018
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The Illusion of Alberta’s Jobs Recovery: Government vs. Private Sector Employment

The Illusion of Alberta’s Jobs Recovery: Government vs. Private Sector Employment finds that Alberta’s employment growth over the past four years is being driven by nearly 79,000 new government jobs, while the private sector has shed more than 46,000 jobs over the same period. In fact, from July 2014 to May 2018, the government sector’s share of total employment (excluding the self-employed) increased from 19.5 per cent to 23.2 per cent—the highest it’s been since 1994.

— Aug 23, 2018
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Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 Edition

Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 finds that the City of Vancouver spent 84 per cent more, per resident, and collected 61 per cent higher per resident revenues in 2016 than Surrey, the next largest municipality by population in the region. The study compares 17 of the Metro Vancouver Regional District’s 21 municipalities on several measures—including government spending, revenue and debt—from 2007 to 2016, the most recent year of available data.

— Aug 21, 2018
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Restoring Ontario's Public Finances

Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances finds that Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but doing so will require a focus on spending discipline. In fact, a five per cent reduction in spending from 2017/18 levels would achieve a balanced budget by 2020/21—years earlier than the 2024/25 timeline set by the previous government—and also free up $21 billion in fiscal room, which could be used to reduce taxes.

— Aug 8, 2018
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta finds that public-sector employees in Alberta—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 9.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.