Provincial Prosperity

— Mar 31, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Learning from Ontario’s Past

Learning from Ontario’s Past: How Ontario Can Avoid Another Post-Recession Debt Binge is a new study that focuses on how the provincial government could balance the budget by 2022/23, and what mistakes made by past governments should be avoided to ensure fiscal stability. Based on recent projections, the provincial government would need to reduce annual spending by $9.1 billion from its 2021/22 level to balance the budget in 2022/23—a 4.8 per cent decrease.

— Mar 24, 2022
Printer-friendly version
High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec

High Tax Rates on Top Earners in Atlantic Canada and Quebec is a new study that finds Atlantic Canada and Quebec have some of the highest personal income tax rates nationwide on individuals and households that earn $100,000 or more a year, but also have the lowest percentages of tax filers with over $100,000 of income. By comparison, Ontario and western Canadian provinces have lower tax rates on high-income earners, and also a higher share of tax filers that earn more than $100,000 annually.

— Mar 10, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Four Myths about Economic Diversification in Alberta

Four Myths about economic diversification in Alberta is a new study that finds despite misperceptions, oil and gas production in the province does not dominate economic activity or employment in Alberta to the point that the provincial economy is notably less diversified than other provinces. In fact, with respect to employment, Alberta’s was the most diversified provincial economy in Canada in 2020.

— Feb 3, 2022
Printer-friendly version
A New Fiscal Framework for Alberta

A New Fiscal Framework for Alberta is a new study that finds rather than use precarious resource revenue to support high spending in Alberta, the Alberta Sustainability Fund (ASF) should be reintroduced and have contributions to the Heritage fund renewed to ensure long-term financial stability in the province.

— Feb 1, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Measuring Ontario’s Regional Prosperity Gap, 2022 Update

Measuring Ontario’s Regional Prosperity Gap: 2022 Update is a new study that compares average incomes in Ontario, Quebec and eight American states in the Great Lakes region. It finds that in 2020, Ontario’s GDP per person trailed neighbouring Michigan by over $6,000, and in fact, Ontario lags the regional average GDP per person by $19,219 or 32.7 per cent.

— Jan 11, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Worrying Trends in BC’s Testing of Grade 10 Students

Worrying Trends in BC’s Testing of Grade 10 Students finds that in 2019/20 only 40 per cent of Grade 10 students in British Columbia scored proficient or above in numeracy and only 75 per cent scored proficient or above in literacy.

Subscribe to the Fraser Institute

Get the latest news from the Fraser Institute on the latest research studies, news and events.