Provincial Prosperity

— Aug 23, 2018
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Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 Edition

Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 finds that the City of Vancouver spent 84 per cent more, per resident, and collected 61 per cent higher per resident revenues in 2016 than Surrey, the next largest municipality by population in the region. The study compares 17 of the Metro Vancouver Regional District’s 21 municipalities on several measures—including government spending, revenue and debt—from 2007 to 2016, the most recent year of available data.

— Aug 21, 2018
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Restoring Ontario's Public Finances

Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances finds that Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but doing so will require a focus on spending discipline. In fact, a five per cent reduction in spending from 2017/18 levels would achieve a balanced budget by 2020/21—years earlier than the 2024/25 timeline set by the previous government—and also free up $21 billion in fiscal room, which could be used to reduce taxes.

— Aug 8, 2018
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta finds that public-sector employees in Alberta—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 9.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

— Jul 26, 2018
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia finds that public-sector employees in B.C.—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 7.5 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

— Jun 19, 2018
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Increasing the Minimum Wage in Ontario: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy

Increasing the Minimum Wage in Ontario: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy finds that raising the minimum wage would do little to reduce poverty in Ontario because the vast majority of minimum-wage earners don’t live in low-income households. In fact, nearly 60 per cent of all minimum-wage earners in the province in 2017 were teenagers or young adults aged 15 to 24, almost all of whom (86.3 per cent) lived with their parents or other relatives.

— Jun 19, 2018
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Report Card on British Columbia's Secondary Schools 2018

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2018 rates more than 250 public and independent secondary schools based on seven academic indicators using student results from annual provincewide exams, grade-to-grade transition rates, and graduation rates. The Report Card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else. In addition to five years of academic results, the Report Card also shows which schools are improving or falling behind.