Provincial Prosperity

— Aug 6, 2020
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Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax?

Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax? Finds that B.C.’s new “health tax,” which essentially replaced the province’s Medical Services Plan (MSP), will cost the average worker nearly $3,000 per year in foregone wages.

— Jul 14, 2020
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The Revenue Effects of Rescinding Ontario's Tax Rate Hike on High-Income Earners

The Revenue Effects of Rescinding Ontario’s Tax Rate Hike on High-income Earners finds that lowering the province’s top personal income tax rate from the current 20.53 per cent back to 17.41 per cent—where it was prior to a so-called “temporary” rate hike in 2012—would only cost the government $26 million in the first year in foregone tax revenues, thanks to increased economic activity. And lowering the province’s top personal income tax rate would significantly increase Ontario’s attractiveness for investment, entrepreneurs and high-skilled workers.

— Apr 28, 2020
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A Friend in Need: How Albertans Continue to Keep Federal Finances Afloat, 2020

A Friend in Need: How Albertans Continue to Keep Federal Finances Afloat, 2020 finds that from 2014 to 2018, Alberta’s net contribution to federal finances was $94.9 billion, by far the largest contribution from any province during that time period. Crucially, Ontario’s net contribution was $58.3 billion, but it’s population in 2018 was more than three times larger than Alberta’s. British Columbia was the only other net contributing province ($29.6 billion) during that time, meaning every other province received more from Ottawa than it sent to Ottawa.

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