Provincial Prosperity

— Apr 5, 2018
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The Decline and Fall of ICBC

The Decline and Fall of ICBC finds that misguided government decisions that stalled revenues and failed to contain runaway costs are largely to blame for the financial crisis facing the Insurance Company of British Columbia, which is facing a $1.3 billion loss this year.

— Mar 27, 2018
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Why Is Alberta’s Deficit Still So Big?

Why Is Alberta’s Deficit Still So Big? finds that the province’s $8.8 billion deficit this year is not primarily due to low oil prices, but is largely a product of the Notley government’s spending decisions. In fact, if the current government had adhered to the spending plan it inherited from its predecessor laid out in the 2015 budget, the deficit today would be approximately $3 billion—less than half of the deficit actually posted in the recent provincial budget.

— Mar 22, 2018
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Subsidized Daycare—What British Columbia Can Learn from Quebec’s 20-Year Experiment

Subsidized Daycare—What British Columbia Can Learn from Quebec’s 20-Year Experiment finds that policymakers in B.C. should learn from Quebec’s government-subsidized daycare program, which has proven costly for taxpayers, has not paid for itself and has experienced mixed child development outcomes.

— Mar 15, 2018
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Ontario’s Lost Decade: 2007–2016

Ontario’s Lost Decade: 2007-2016 finds that, despite upbeat government rhetoric, Ontario’s economic growth in 2017 was not enough to repair the damage done during the preceding decade when the province’s economic performance was among the worst in Canada. In fact, from 2007 to 2016 Ontario was at or near the bottom on several important economic indicators compared to Canada’s other provinces, including per capita GDP growth, debt accumulation and annual private-sector job growth.

— Feb 28, 2018
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Designing a Referendum Question for British Columbia

Designing a Referendum Question for British Columbia finds that if the B.C. government moves forward with electoral reform, it should hold two referenda—with clear, unbiased questions—to ensure voters are fully informed, based on best practices from around the world.

— Feb 15, 2018
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Alternative Paths for Alberta's Budget: Balance by 2023/24 Is Not Enough

Alternative Paths for Alberta’s Budget: Balance by 2023/24 Is Not Enough finds that the Alberta government could balance the budget years ahead of its self-imposed 2023/24 deadline with modest spending discipline and avoid accumulating tens of billions of dollars in additional debt. Moreover, the government is currently not on track to meet even its modest goal of balancing its budget by 2023/24 and will, in fact, run a $5 billion deficit that year if current revenue and spending trends continue.