business subsidies

10:13AM
Printer-friendly version
Paying companies to stay—bad idea

The Legault government in Quebec tabled its first budget last week.


2:01PM
Printer-friendly version
Scrap corporate welfare and restore Canada’s business tax advantage over the U.S.

Business subsidies can also irritate our trading partners, threatening Canadian access to foreign markets including the U.S.


10:11AM
Printer-friendly version
The Ontario government will give $4.9 million to support small cideries and distilleries in the province.

3:00AM
Printer-friendly version
By some estimates Ottawa gives $6 billion a year in support of business.

10:00AM
Printer-friendly version
The federal government will provide Bombardier, a Canadian aerospace company, with interest-free loans totalling $372.5 million.

2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Ever wonder how Canada’s net federal debt reached $671 billion by 2013? Or how net provincial debt among the provinces ended up at $509 billion that same year? Wonder no more. It’s partially due to massive subsidies to corporations, government businesses and even consumers that over three decades amounted to $684 billion.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Back in late 2011 after the Occupy Wall Street protests, Fiat-Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne gave a speech in Toronto to decry what he called “the most inane displays of greed.” The reference was to behaviour he had observed while serving on various company boards over the years.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

The federal government recently poured $36.3 million into the Northleaf Venture Catalyst Fund – the first of many soon-to-come government-sponsored funds comprising Ottawa’s $400 million “Venture Capital Action Plan.” The plan, conceived with the view that Canada’s lacklustre venture capital industry requires a government solution, ignores Canadian evidence that shows government-sponsored


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

In the land of government plenty—that vast landscape populated with the tax dollars of Canadians—there is no shortage of politicians willing to hand out and defend subsidies to business and no dearth of corporations willing to take the cash.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

In his 1946 essay, Politics and the English Language, George Orwell argued that, “political speech and writing are largely the defence of the indefensible.” Orwell’s quip came to mind again recently after reading Bombardier’s defence of taxpayer subsidies to business, this in response to my recent study on the matter.