canadian consumer tax index

Taxes—the average Canadian family’s largest expense

More than 50 per cent of our tax dollars finance generous pay for government employees.

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Summary

  • The Canadian Consumer Tax Index tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian family from 1961 to 2016. Including all types of taxes, that bill has increased by 2,006% since 1961.
  • Taxes have grown much more rapidly than any other single expenditure for the average Canadian family: expenditures on shelter increased by 1,527%, clothing by 677%, and food by 639% from 1961 to 2016.
  • The 2,006% increase in the tax bill has also greatly outpaced the increase in the Consumer Price Index (718%), which measures the average price that consumers pay for food, shelter, clothing, transportation, health and personal care, education, and other items.
  • The average Canadian family now spends more of its income on taxes (42.5%) than it does on basic necessities such as food, shelter, and clothing combined (37.4%). By comparison, 33.5% of the average family’s income went to pay taxes in 1961 while 56.5% went to basic necessities.
  • In 2016, the average Canadian family earned an income of $83,105 and paid total taxes equaling $35,283 (42.5%). In 1961, the average family had an income of $5,000 and paid a total tax bill of $1,675 (33.5%).

‘Anti-tax’ accusation is simply wrong

Once government spending surpasses 30 per cent of GDP, economic growth declines.

Canadian families spend more on taxes than the basic necessities of life

The average Canadian family paid $34,154 in total taxes last year.
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Summary

  • The Canadian Consumer Tax Index tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian family from 1961 to 2015. Including all types of taxes, that bill has increased by 1,939% since 1961.
  • Taxes have grown much more rapidly than any other single expenditure for the average Canadian family: expenditures on shelter increased by 1,425%, clothing by 746%, and food by 645% from 1961 to 2015.
  • The 1,939% increase in the tax bill has also greatly outpaced the increase in the Consumer Price Index (706%), which measures the average price that consumers pay for food, shelter, clothing, transportation, health and personal care, education, and other items.
  • The average Canadian family now spends more of its income on taxes (42.4%) than it does on basic necessities such as food, shelter, and clothing combined (37.6%). By comparison, 33.5% of the average family’s income went to pay taxes in 1961 while 56.5% went to basic necessities.
  • In 2015, the average Canadian family earned an income of $80,593 and paid total taxes equaling $34,154 (42.4%). In 1961, the average family had an income of $5,000 and paid a total tax bill of $1,675 (33.5%).
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