equalization

10:02AM
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Equalization—separating fact from fiction

Alberta ran a $3.1 billion deficit in 2012/13—when oil prices were over US$80 per barrel.


11:45AM
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Notley's late (and little) holiday gift for Alberta

Quebec slammed the door on the resurrection of the Energy East pipeline.


3:54PM
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The two biggest automatic stabilizers from Ottawa are income taxes and employment insurance payments.


7:25AM
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Equalization is not to blame—Alberta is

Successive governments have increased spending faster than the rate of economic growth or inflation-plus-population.


10:19AM
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Equalization makes for a handy scapegoat, but successive Alberta governments have no one to blame but themselves for the province’s fiscal problems.


11:37AM
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Removing resource revenue from equalization would do nothing for Alberta

Jason Kenney, leadership candidate for Alberta’s United Conservative Party, called for reform to Canada’s equalization program.


6:00AM
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In a year when two heavyweight provinces, Ontario and Alberta, which together constitute 55 per cent of Canada’s GDP, are running substantial deficits, there are three ways to reduce the red ink.


10:00AM
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With the plunge in oil prices over the last six months (and already soft natural gas prices), it’s not headline news to note that provinces heavily dependent on energy-related revenues are suffering.