exports

1:45PM
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Trade with China may actually have increased manufacturing employment in the United States.


2:26PM
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The WTO has become a key player in a high-stakes international poker game.


12:39PM
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Supply management was established in the 1970s because Canadian dairy and poultry farmers didn’t want cross-province competition.


3:56PM
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While the Americans build tariff walls, we should form new trade relationships with other countries.


3:40PM
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Tariffs hurt Canadian consumers, but also Canadian producers who rely on imported inputs.


1:03PM
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Overspending in the United States causes market forces to appreciate the dollar exchange rate.


2:00AM
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When we talk about energy policy here in Canada, whether provincial or national, the discussion usually revolves around investment, jobs, revenues, and the environment. That’s generally been the terms of discussion on the recently killed Northern Gateway pipeline: who’ll get the money, who’ll get the jobs, and who’ll bear the risk. But there’s another dimension to energy policy that is often left out of the discussion, which is the idea of energy security, not only for Canada, but for the world as a whole. And decisions like Northern Gateway do little to add to Canada’s energy security.