governance

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China sets debt traps, threatens militarily

China has already blocked 15 million of its citizens from train and airline travel.


2:32PM
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With true self-governance, funding and service levels are no longer determined by federal bureaucrats.


9:05AM
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The Liberal campaign platform has some laudable goals. However, one of the worrying policy initiatives, and one that is hopefully de-prioritized, is the raising of the top marginal federal tax rate on personal income from 29 to 33 per cent.


2:00AM
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“Travel,” said Francis Bacon, “is part of education” for the young and “a part of experience” for those who are older. But there is an additional benefit from a journey outside of one’s own borders: a reminder of why certain places function better than others.


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Canada is a superb creation and initial credit for that must, obviously, go to Canada’s fathers of Confederation. How we came about is a fascinating tale of seemingly intractable regional disputes resolved, at least for a time, by new institutions and a new country.


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When Christy Clark recently asserted British Columbia didn’t need the federal government and also said “we don't need Alberta,” the B.C. premier demonstrated why Canada’s founding fathers were concerned about provincial politicians: when they think in isolation, such premiers harm the interests of all Canadians.

The context of Clark’s election-time remark was how BC could become an energy superpower if more natural gas was developed and delivered through pipelines, as opposed to “allowing” oil pipelines to crisscross British Columbia more than they already do.


3:00AM
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In the 1992 referendum on the Charlottetown Accord, British Columbians rejected the proposed amendments to Canada’s constitution with the highest “no” vote in the country (68.3%). Also in the “no” camp were Manitoba (61.6%) and then Alberta (60.2%). Four other provinces also turned it down and the package barely passed in Ontario.  

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Last week the newly elected Premier of British Columbia made two dramatic announcements. One regarding the selection of cabinet and the second regarding major reductions in personal income taxes. The divergence in the nature of the two announcements underscores the unique and often bizarre character of BC politics.