hydraulic fracturing

10:45AM
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Attacks on hydraulic fracturing in B.C. defy settled science

Fracking in Canada is highly regulated, with extensive governmental oversight and self-imposed industry best-practices.


2:36PM
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The risks that hydraulic fracturing poses to air appear to be modest and manageable with current technologies.


11:37AM
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While the numbers may sound large, in terms of how much water it takes to fracture a well, in the grand scheme of things the percentages of total water use are quite small.


11:32AM
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The risk of well integrity failures are similar to other areas of risk for hydraulic fracturing—the risks tend to be quite low.


11:55AM
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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found no evidence that hydraulic fracturing led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources.


10:00AM
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Canada’s federal equalization program is motivated by good intentions. However, the program has unintended consequences, and creates perverse incentives that have allowed at least two “have-not” provinces to shun sensible economic opportunities.

11:00AM
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New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, seems poised to follow through on a campaign promise to institute a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing.