jobs

1:23PM
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The province’s portion of national GDP growth eclipsed 42 per cent in both 2006 and 2012.


3:25PM
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From 2004 to 2014, 270,926 more Canadians came to Alberta from other provinces than left the province.

3:00AM
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Labour market performance has been extremely weak since the last recession.


3:00AM
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Between 2010 and 2015, average annual employment growth in eastern Ontario was negative at -0.6 per cent.

9:03AM
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Employment in the region remains below pre-recession levels.

3:00AM
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The 1,000 Carrier workers are happy—the unknown future job-losers can only stuff their pink slips in their pockets and wait until next election.

8:34AM
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Is anyone really sorry that the job of door-opener on subways has been made technologically obsolete?


11:00AM
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Whenever some group claims that wages can be artificially boosted via government intervention, as one Ontario lobby group recently did, ask them this question...

9:00AM
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When Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa announced a budget update and a revised, lower forecast for provincial economic growth, it was yet another piece of evidence that Ontario’s economy is sluggish. But Ontario’s problems run deeper than just one fiscal update from one finance minister.


9:00AM
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Question: If you’re young, or have very little education, where’s the best place in the country to find a job, make a decent income and prosper? Answer: Alberta, followed by Saskatchewan and British Columbia.