ontario health care

4:13PM
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The original OHIP+ provided limited coverage to a population that largely didn’t need assistance.


12:52PM
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Ontarians must consider real health-care reform

Health care consumes 42 per cent of all provincial government program spending in Ontario.


8:41AM
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Queen's Park should amend existing programs to better target vulnerable groups.

2:00AM
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This week, Ontario Health Minister Deb Matthews published her plan for controlling provincial government health spending. While the Minister is correct when she says the growth of provincial health care spending is not sustainable, her proposed solution – more government-imposed central planning and bureaucratic management – is wrong. Ontario’s health system does not have a ‘management’ problem; it has an ‘economics’ problem.

2:00AM
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Facing a $16-billion deficit, the Ontario government announced it will stop funding a handful of medical services currently covered by the public health insurer. This should come as no surprise, as it has become the norm in Ontario as well as other Canadian provinces. This is because cost-containment strategies such as rationing access to medical services are intrinsic characteristics of single-payer health insurance.

2:00AM
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With a provincial election approaching in Ontario, a recent Nanos poll shows that health care remains the most important issue for the majority of voters. The second and third most important issues are the economy and high taxes.  In truth, all three issues are connected. Public health spending is a major cause of higher taxes and higher taxes hinder economic growth.