pensions

12:27PM
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The expanded CPP’s overall rate of return for workers is a meagre 2.5 per cent.


11:00AM
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Against a backdrop of persistent deficits and growing debt, the federal and many provincial governments are engaged in collective bargaining negotiations with their public-sector unions.

9:00AM
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As the Quebec government struggles to eliminate its deficit and rein in the largest debt burden in Canada, it has identified government-sector compensation as a way to restrain spending and balance the budget in 2015/16.


9:00AM
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With declining energy prices and a vulnerable economy, the provincial and various municipal governments in British Columbia are facing important fiscal challenges. This warrants a sober review of government spending.

2:00AM
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The government sector in Alberta is unhappy and they want Premier Alison Redford and her colleagues to know it. Universities are advertising against provincial reductions in their funding; government unions are activating their members about proposed pension changes, reforms that would make them more akin to the private sector and less like a taxpayer-funded entitlement.

It is not clear why the government sector believes it must be immune from change. The case for reform is not difficult to make.


2:00AM
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Canadians routinely hear about alleged growing divides in Canadian society. But here is one rift that often goes unmentioned: the divide between the pension benefits of public sector employees and everyone else.

Such inequality incurs real costs, where ordinary taxpayers pay ever more for above-market, guaranteed pension benefits that ever fewer in the private sector possess.