provincial budget

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One item sorely missing from Finance Minister Mike de Jong’s recent provincial budget was a plan to make BC’s business taxes more competitive and attractive for investment.


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Last week’s provincial budget was a heap of bad news for New Brunswickers. First they learned that they will continue to be burdened by a government with shaky finances driven by annual deficits and mushrooming debt. Topping that off, Progressive Conservative Finance Minister Blaine Higgs proposed a series of highly damaging tax increases as a way out of New Brunswick’s deep fiscal hole. Unfortunately, these tax hikes will cast a dark cloud over New Brunswick’s economic prospects and likely bring little revenue in return.


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Going by Finance Minister Mike de Jong’s public comments, Tuesday’s provincial budget is supposed to present a plan to finally balance the books. But after four consecutive years in the red, British Columbians can’t yet breathe a collective sigh of relief. Critically important is how Minister de Jong plans to eliminate the deficit. Will he take the path of tax increases or spending reductions?


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Sitting down with my morning cup of coffee and Saturday's National Post, I was delighted to read Andrew Coyne's scathing criticism of the federal Conservatives' record in office, based on comments he was to make at this year's Manning Networking Conference (Is there a conservative in the House?, March 10).

Where has conservatism gone? Coyne asked. Unfortunately, Post readers didn't have to look far for the answer - the adjacent page to be precise.

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With economic uncertainty as the backdrop, it was critical for the BC government to put forth a prudent budget. Finance minister Kevin Falcon acknowledged as much by reassuring British Columbians that the budget was “built on fiscal discipline” and lays a “firm foundation for the future.” Falcon even warned of the perils of additional government taxes, spending, and borrowing in the current economic environment, calling such measures “potentially catastrophic.”