retirement plans

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With talks to expand the Canada Pension Plan having stalled, the Ontario government has pledged to roll out its own provincial version.

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Now that the province has reaffirmed its intent to lightly modify government employee pension plans, government unions will again try to divert the public from the facts.

For example, after my recent column on the ever-increasing cost to taxpayers of public sector pension plans, Guy Smith, president of the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees and Marle Roberts, president of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (Alberta), cried foul.


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One theory about politics is that because politicians must get votes to stay in power—that’s their “currency”— they are unlikely to act against their own self-interest. So politicians cater to the specific voters who put them in power in the first place.


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When Alberta’s Finance Minister Doug Horner recently announced that the province will reform public sector pension plans, the reaction was predictable: government employees’ unions set their collective hair on fire. Thus, Guy Smith, Alberta Union of Provincial Employees president, remarked that the province’s planned reforms will “fundamentally” undermine the “the retirement security of more than 70,000 AUPE members.”