union dues

11:25AM
Printer-friendly version

A recent Supreme Court decision in the United States will allow workers in the government sector to decide whether they pay union dues or not.


9:10AM
Printer-friendly version
Proposed changes to Alberta labour laws will hurt Alberta workers

Without a secret ballot, union organizers may pressure workers into supporting union certification.


8:33AM
Printer-friendly version
Without the anonymity of a secret ballot, union organizers may pressure workers into supporting union certification.

9:00AM
Printer-friendly version
For many Canadians, Labour Day is an opportunity to take a break from the day-to-day hustle of work, and relax or do something fun. But it’s also a good time to reflect on ways to improve our country’s labour relations laws, which govern the interaction between workers, unions, and employers.

6:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Ontario, once Canada’s flourishing economic and manufacturing hub, is in steady decline with slow economic growth and rapidly expanding government debt being a sad yet reoccurring story.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

With Labour Day fresh in our memory and Ontario’s unemployment rate having recently increased to 7.6 per cent, the province would do well to follow Indiana and Michigan’s lead and adopt worker choice laws. Doing so would make Ontario a significantly more competitive jurisdiction for business investment and provide a much needed shot in the arm for the province’s struggling manufacturing sector.

In 2012, both Indiana and Michigan enacted worker choice laws and there is a reasonable likelihood that Ohio may soon do the same.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

 

As labour and capital have become more and more mobile, jurisdictional competitiveness is becoming more important in securing and maintaining economic prosperity. A minimum requirement is to have taxes, regulations, and other important policies competitive with competing jurisdictions. To gain an advantage, jurisdictions need policies that differentiate themselves from competing jurisdictions.

As BC’s recently minted Clark government works through its economic priorities, it would be well advised to consider worker choice laws.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version
Prior to 2012, the momentum and even interest in so-called Right-to-Work (RTW) laws, or what are more accurately referred to as Worker Choice laws was non-existent. Very little reform had happened for over a decade despite the positive economic effects of such laws. Things changed in 2012 when Indiana and more shockingly the bedrock of unionism in the U.S., Michigan, decided to implement RTW laws. These tectonic shifts in labour laws south of the border have reinvigorated interest in labour law reform in Canada.