provincial budget

8:26AM
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Alberta celebrates ‘Balanced Budget Tax Freedom Day’ later than any other province

This year's combined projected federal and provincial government deficits total $234 billion.


9:25AM
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Provinces should study Saskatchewan’s fiscal recovery of the 1990s

This year, the 10 provinces are projected to run cumulative deficits of nearly $80 billion.


10:13AM
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Canadians paying dearly for mounting provincial debt

In Canada, government net debt has doubled from $1 trillion to $2 trillion.


3:17PM
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P.E.I. deficit may be bigger than forecasts

Forecasts project a -5.1 per cent decline in the province's GDP.


11:09AM
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McNeil government faces debt tidal wave

The province’s net debt will rise from $15.2 billion to nearly $17.2 billion.


11:24AM
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Estimating the recessionary impact on Nova Scotia finances—Part 1

RBC forecasts an $800 million provincial deficit this year, Scotiabank forecasts $970 million.


2:00AM
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One item sorely missing from Finance Minister Mike de Jong’s recent provincial budget was a plan to make BC’s business taxes more competitive and attractive for investment.


2:00AM
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Last week’s provincial budget was a heap of bad news for New Brunswickers. First they learned that they will continue to be burdened by a government with shaky finances driven by annual deficits and mushrooming debt. Topping that off, Progressive Conservative Finance Minister Blaine Higgs proposed a series of highly damaging tax increases as a way out of New Brunswick’s deep fiscal hole. Unfortunately, these tax hikes will cast a dark cloud over New Brunswick’s economic prospects and likely bring little revenue in return.


2:00AM
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Going by Finance Minister Mike de Jong's public comments, Tuesday's provincial budget is supposed to present a plan to finally balance the books. But after four consecutive years in the red, British Columbians can't yet breathe a collective sigh of relief. Critically important is how Minister de Jong plans to eliminate the deficit. Will he take the path of tax increases or spending reductions?