Entrepreneurship

— Sep 29, 2021
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Canada’s Faltering Business Dynamism and Lagging Innovation

Canada’s Faltering Business Dynamism and Lagging Innovation is a new study that examines how economic growth and business investment have been faltering in Canada. The study finds that Canada’s economic growth (measured by GDP, adjusted for inflation) over the past decade was the slowest since the 1930s, stalling productivity and hampering the country’s ability to encourage innovation or new business start-ups.

— Oct 8, 2020
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Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas

Job Creation and Housing Starts in Canada’s Largest Metropolitan Areas is a new study that finds the Vancouver and Toronto areas—while accounting for less than 25 per cent of Canada’s population, accounted for 120,000 new jobs from 2015 to 2019. But over the same period, the number of new housing starts in the two regions remained largely stagnant at approximately 57,000 a year—a rate that has largely been unchanged since 2002.

— Jul 30, 2020
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Technology Startups and Industry-Specific Regulations

Technology Startups and Industry-Specific Regulations finds that heavier regulatory burdens on technology startup companies in Canada are associated with a greater chance that startups will fail—and those burdens can also prevent prospective companies from starting in the first place.

— Jul 28, 2020
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Capital Investment in Canada’s Provinces: A Provincial Report

Capital Investment in Canada's Provinces: A Provincial Report measures growth in investment at the provincial level from 1990 to 2014 and from 2014 to 2018, the most recent year of comparable data. It finds that many of the provinces that historically enjoyed strong levels of investment—such as Alberta and Saskatchewan—have seen investment stall as a result of low oil prices. While British Columbia and Ontario remain strong performers, largely as a result of strong housing and finance sectors, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have consistently lagged the national average over the 30-year period. Newfoundland and Labrador has enjoyed some of the highest investment growth in the country because of large hydroelectric projects currently underway in the province.

Entrepreneurship Research Experts

  • Executive Vice President, Fraser Institute
  • Distinguished Professor of Finance and Entrepreneurship, Florida Atlantic University
  • Senior Fellow and Addington Chair in Measurement, Fraser Institute
  • Professor of Economics & Entrepreneurship, Baker School of Business at The Citadel
  • President, Fraser Institute