Pensions and Retirement

The federal government and several provinces want to expand the Canada Pension Plan. If they do, working Canadians will be contributing more to the CPP. But the arguments favouring CPP expansion are based on some incorrect (or at least, debatable) claims. Here are the five common claims used to argue for CPP expansion—and why they are myths that must be refuted.

— Apr 3, 2019
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Albertans Make Disproportionate Contributions to National Programs: The Canada Pension Plan as a Case Study

Albertans Make Disproportionate Contributions to National Programs: The Canada Pension Plan as a Case Study finds that in 2017, workers in Alberta paid $2.9 billion more into the Canada Pension Plan than Alberta retirees received in CPP payments. In fact, from 2008 to 2017, the total net contribution to the CPP from Albertan workers—the amount over and above what Alberta retirees were paid—was a staggering $27.9 billion. Ontario, the next highest contributing province, had a net contribution of just $7.4 billion over the same decade.

— Dec 6, 2018
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Risk and Reward in Public Sector Pension Plans: A Taxpayer’s Perspective

Risk and Reward in Public Sector Pension Plans: a Taxpayer’s Perspective finds that government employees don’t pay the full cost of their defined-benefit pensions, and in fact, taxpayers provide a $22 billion annual subsidy to public sector pensions by assuming undisclosed investment risks for which they are not compensated.

— Jun 5, 2018
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Understanding the Regulatory Framework Governing Private and Public Pensions

Understanding the Regulatory Framework Governing Private and Public Pensions finds that private pensions are subject to far more rules and regulations than the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), are more complex in their make-up and face higher costs as a result.

— May 3, 2018
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Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment

Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment finds that by increasing the Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, the federal and provincial governments will inadvertently shrink the pool of money available for investments in Canada—potentially up to $114 billion by 2030.

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