student achievement

3:23PM
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Upcoming PISA results will shed light on student performance across Canada
Canada’s national math score dropped 16 points from 2003 to 2015.

11:52AM
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Study exposes ‘class size’ myth in Canada

Singapore, the top-scoring country in math and science , had eight more students (on average) in its high school classes than Canada.


9:35AM
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Smaller classes don’t necessarily mean better student outcomes

After a certain point, you get less “bang for the buck” for any additional spending.


3:00AM
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Per student education spending in Canada increased by 39 per cent in just over a decade.


1:50PM
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Almost half of all independent schools in Ontario have a religious orientation.

3:00AM
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From 2003/04 to 2012/13, enrolments in public schools in Canada declined by 4.9 per cent compared to 17.2 per cent in Newfoundland and Labrador.

11:38AM
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Last week marked the one-year anniversary of the exoneration of Lynden Dorval, an Edmonton physics teacher who was fired for giving zeroes on student assignments that were not completed.


6:30AM
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The one-room schoolhouse may be a relic of a bygone era, but teacher compensation in Canada remains stuck in a time warp. Currently, teacher compensation is determined by rigid salary schedules based on tenure and credentials—factors that have little if any positive impact on student achievement. Compensating teachers for raising student achievement is a policy that’s better for teachers, students, and taxpayers.