Risk & Regulation

— Jul 17, 2018
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Phasing Out Supply Management: Lessons from Australia's Dairy Industry

Phasing Out Supply Management: Lessons from Australia’s Dairy Industry finds that Canadian consumers and the dairy industry could both benefit from phasing out supply management. In fact, immediately following deregulation of Australia’s dairy industry in 2000, the price of milk dropped 12 cents per litre, and farm gate prices—the price farmers receive for their product—increased 56 per cent. Australian milk farmers now export about half their product, making dairy the country’s third most important agricultural export after beef and wheat.

— May 31, 2018
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Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment

Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment finds that environmental assessments for resource development projects, such as oil and gas pipelines, have always been arbitrary and political, and the federal government’s proposed reforms—contained in Bill C-69—do nothing to change that. If anything, the changes may increase uncertainty in the project approval process.

— May 25, 2016
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Technological Change and Its Implications for Regulating Canada's Television Broadcasting Sector

Technological Change and Its Implications for Regulating Canada’s Television Broadcasting Sector finds that the low-cost methods of creating and distributing broadcasting content means that the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) traditional policies to protect and subsidize Canadian content are increasingly unsustainable.

— Nov 3, 2015
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ranching realities

Ranching Realities in the 21st Century highlights land ownership structures in the province of Alberta where over nine million acres of land is owned by the government and leased to farmers and ranchers. Through a collection of essays, the book looks to other jurisdictions to identify alternative structures that could facilitate higher earnings per acre of land, more livestock, or better protection of ecologically sensitive lands.  It finds that land policies in Alberta, and elsewhere, can be enhanced if policies ensure that property rights are well-defined and transferable.

Risk & Regulation Research Experts

  • Associate Professor of Geography, University of Toronto
  • Resident Scholar and Chair in Energy and Environmental Studies, Fraser Institute
  • Associate Professor of Economics, University of Vermont
  • Professor of Economics, University of Guelph
  • Associate Professor of Economics, Thompson Rivers University
  • Associate Professor of Law, University of Alberta