Risk & Regulation

— Nov 19, 2018
Printer-friendly version
The Flight of Capital From Canada

The Flight of Capital From Canada finds that a host of economic measures indicate that Canada continues to underperform when it comes to business investment, which is crucial for improving living standards and generating prosperity. Notably, from 2013 to 2017, Canadians increasingly invested abroad while at the same time, foreign direct investment in Canada dropped a staggering 55.1 per cent from 2013.

— Oct 23, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta

Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta finds that the province’s investment attractiveness has diminished in the eyes of oil, gas and mining executives, primarily due to the province’s increasing regulatory burden. Specifically, environmental regulations and the cost of complying with Alberta’s red tape are increasingly cited as reasons not to invest in the province.

— Oct 23, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Strategies for Deregulation: Concepts and Evidence

Strategies for Deregulation: Concepts and Evidence outlines how other jurisdictions—for example, British Columbia in 2001 and the federal government in 2015—successfully reduced outdated regulations. Best practices include broad public consultations to identify regulations for elimination, requiring a net reduction of existing regulations, and specifically tasking an independent agency or government department to reduce regulations.

— Jul 17, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Phasing Out Supply Management: Lessons from Australia's Dairy Industry

Phasing Out Supply Management: Lessons from Australia’s Dairy Industry finds that Canadian consumers and the dairy industry could both benefit from phasing out supply management. In fact, immediately following deregulation of Australia’s dairy industry in 2000, the price of milk dropped 12 cents per litre, and farm gate prices—the price farmers receive for their product—increased 56 per cent. Australian milk farmers now export about half their product, making dairy the country’s third most important agricultural export after beef and wheat.

— May 31, 2018
Printer-friendly version
Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment

Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment finds that environmental assessments for resource development projects, such as oil and gas pipelines, have always been arbitrary and political, and the federal government’s proposed reforms—contained in Bill C-69—do nothing to change that. If anything, the changes may increase uncertainty in the project approval process.

— May 25, 2016
Printer-friendly version
Technological Change and Its Implications for Regulating Canada's Television Broadcasting Sector

Technological Change and Its Implications for Regulating Canada’s Television Broadcasting Sector finds that the low-cost methods of creating and distributing broadcasting content means that the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) traditional policies to protect and subsidize Canadian content are increasingly unsustainable.

Risk & Regulation Research Experts

  • Associate Professor of Geography, University of Toronto
  • Resident Scholar and Chair in Energy and Environmental Studies, Fraser Institute
  • Associate Professor of Economics, University of Vermont
  • Professor of Economics, University of Guelph
  • Associate Professor of Economics, Thompson Rivers University
  • Associate Professor of Law, University of Alberta